BRAZIL CSA.jpg
FLAG FLORIDA.jpg
Page 1.jpg
Page 1.jpg

C

 

CARLTON,

Richard C.

Richard G. Carlton served with the 21st Battalion, Georgia Cavalry, Co. B and later in Co. E. When the 7th Regiment, Georgia Cavalry was organized, he was assigned to Company F of the 7th.

Pvt. Carlton, returning home after the war, found they had lost everything during the Sherman criminal burnings. He and his wife Cynthia moved to Brazil shortly after the war when they found that the emperor of Brazil was offering free land for establishing agriculture. After moving to Brazil, Richard and Cynthia had a daughter, Betty, who married Eugene Virgil Seawright, son of Ebenezer W. Seawright, a manufacturer of farm equipment.

Information provided by Hilton Seawright, gg-grandson of Richard Carlton.

 

The above mentioned "Betty" was Anna Elizabeth Carlton

 

CHERRY,

Joseph Jackson

The inclusion of the names of Joseph Jackson Cherry and his wife Elisa Cherry in the list of members of PIB / SB comes from the reference made in a letter written by Dr. Bagby FMB, on June 30, 1881. He says that they lived in Botucatu , SP, and that it was a great effort to come to the sessions in SB, on a trip of 100 miles.

J. J. Cherry and his wife are said to have been from Texas. We don't know when they arrived in Brazil, whether they stayed here, or when they would have returned to the USA. It seems to us that the couple had two children.

D. Cherry going from Rio de Janeiro to New York, leaving on 03.December 1, 1885. (In MPRJ p. 330).

According to documents  found in the Cartorio de Notas, in Santa Barbara, SP, the couple must have arrived there at the end of 1874 or beginning of 1875. From the date of 1May 1, 1875, onwards, they  appearon the registration of purchase and sale of property, demand , mortgage, friendly land division, exchange of ownership and finally confirmation that JJ Cherry will acquire a property in Botucatu, next to that of Robert Meriwether. This must have them there throughout the year 1877.

A search  at Cartorio in Botucatu, was unable to locate his name in the Distribution sector. Also,  not found was a record of his Obituary or his wife. We were at the local cemetery, in the idea of ​​having some data recorded in lapidary, but, - we found nothing. So, this little information is recorded here about the Cherry couple.

 SOURCE:  Loosely translated and paraphrased from the original Portuguese manuscript.

CENTELHA   EM  RE STOLHO  SECO

Uma  Contribuiao  para  a  Hist6ria dos Prim6rdios do Trabalho Batista no Brasil    1985

Betty  Antunes  de Oliveira

 

 

COULTER,

David Reddock 

THE, COULTER FAMILY, UNION COUNTY, ARKANSAS

By Robert, W. Worley

David Reddock Coulter was the second son of John M. Coulter and Nancy Reddock Coulter. He was born on Sept: 4, 1810 and came to Arkansas in' 1836 with his parents and, brothers. He married Elizabeth Yoakum of Kentucky about 1831. She was a cousin of Sarah Yoakum, the wife of his brother, Peter Coulter .. Elizabeth was born Oct. 11,1815. They were married Aug. 20, 1835.

Elizabeth Coulter died Sept. 14, 1864 and was buried in Union County. David It. Coulter died Aug. 10, 1897 and was buried at Mt. Carmel, near Wolf City, Texas., Four generations of this family are buried there. Union County land records indicate David R. Coulter had extensive land holdings. After the Civil War and his wife’s, death, he sold his plantation and went to South America. Along with his son, George D. Coulter, he spent about a year in Brazil near the city of Sao, Paulo. Upon his return to the states he spent a few years in New Orleans as a cotton broker and later purchased 3,000 acres of land in Hunt Co., Texas and remained there until his death. At the Union County home-site of .the Coulter family,  all that remains is the well "a few rotted timbers, three tremendous magnolia trees, several crepe myrtle trees and the six graves",  listed below. They are located in Township 16 South, Range 17: West" Section 33 or 34, Union County, Arkansas. The family cemetery is about three fourths mile off the Mt. Holly road in the vicinity of the Confederate marker recently installed. It is quite overgrown.

(1) 'John A. TOOKE ,(Masonic Emblem) ,    

(2) , Grave" stone, etc. all moved. .

(3) Grave, stone, etc., all moved.

(4) Elizabeth E., wife of D. R. COULTER Born in Washington Co., Ky.

(5) , John M. COULTER, born in Union Co., Ark.

(6) Daniel A. COULTER, born Washington Co. ,Ky.

(7) , Louis G. COULTER, son of D.R. & E.

(8) James R.. COULTER, son of D. R. & E. , 

The 1850 census records for Union Co., Ark. indicate the following about the David R. Coulter family:

Coulter, David R.    40          Georgia

Elizabeth                    35          Kentucky

Daniel                          12          Kentucky

George .                       10         Arkansas

Paul .                              8          Arkansas

 Mary ,                           6           Arkansas

John                              4           Arkansas

Garrett                          1           Arkansas

Occupation , Planter

CHILDREN of David R. Coulter and  Elizabeth Yoakum

1.  

Daniel A. Coulter

BIRTH MAY 6, 1838 • Washington Co., Kentucky - DEATH NOVEMBER 10, 1857 • Union Co., Arkansas

Died at age 19, no known issue

2.

George Dekalb Coulter

BIRTH 25 DEC 1839 • Sevier Co, Arkansas - DEATH 1 APR 1881 • Brazil

Married on April 7, 1872 in Campinas, Sao Paulo , Brazil to Pamela Ann Demaret, BIRTH 22 JUN 1848 • Louisiana, USA - DEATH 19 JUL 1878 • Santa Bárbara, Minas Gerais, Brazil,  the daughter of Martin Felix Demaret II and Pamela Zelde Foster, Confederado settlers of Santa Barbara.  They ae both buried at the Campo Cemetery in Santa Barbara.

George and Pamela would have at least two children:

           1.  Demaret Paul Coulter,  BIRTH 28 FEB 1873 • Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, DEATH 29 DEC 1939 • Lee,                                  Arkansas.  He returned to the USA in 1889 and married on May 28, 1905 in Carter County, Oklahoma, a                              cousin, Docia D. Coulter, the daughter of George Washington Coulter and Amanda Elnora "Nellie" Mitchell .                    They would have at least one child - Permalor Lenora Coulter, born 1906 in Oklahoma.

 

           2.  George Demaret Coulter of which nothing is known.         

3.

Paul James Coulter

BIRTH 14 SEPTEMBER 1842 • Arkansas - DEATH 12 JUNE 1902 • Mt Carmel, Texas, USA.  In   1866 Paul would marry Isadora Brunetta Kensworthy, BIRTH 19 JANUARY 1847 • Hempstead County, Arkansas, DEATH 14 JUNE 1928 • Wolfe City, Hunt County, Texas, the daughter of Ezekial Kensworthy and Mary jane Russey

 

Paul and Isadora would have at least five children:

           1.  Elizabeth Coulter

           2.  David Reddock Coulter

           3.  Mary Elizabeth coulter

           4.  Alice Burton Coulter

           5.  George Daniel Coulter

4.

Mary Coulter

BIRTH AUGUST 20, 1843 • Union Co., Arkansas - 

DEATH JULY 7, 1897 • Malvern,Hot Spring Co.,Arkansas 

Married September 1965 to Henry Alexander Butler  - 

BIRTH SEPTEMBER 18, 1836 • Granville Co., North Carolina

DEATH JUNE 29, 1907 • Malvern, Hot Springs Co., Arkansas

Mary Elizabeth and Henry would have at least 5 children:

           1.  David Coulter Butler,

           2.  Mary Elizabeth Butler,

           3.  Mattie L. Butler,

           4.  George Henry Butler

           5. Nancy M. Butler                                   Henry and Mary E                                                                  Mary E. Coulter Butler                                                                                                 Butler          

 5.

John M. Coulter

BIRTH JUNE 27, 1845 • Union County, Arkansas, - DEATH SEPTEMBER 14, 1864 • Union County, Arkansas

Died young at 19.  No issue. 

6.

James Coulter

BIRTH FEBRUARY 25, 1847 • Union Co., Arkansas - DEATH MARCH 30, 1847 • Union Co., Arkansas

Died as infant.

7.

Louis Garrett Coulter

BIRTH JULY 31, 1849 • Union Co., Arkansas - DEATH MARCH 8, 1853 • Union Co., Arkansas

Died young at 4 years old.

D

 

 

DANIEL,

Charles Davis

Charles  Davis  Daniel as  born on  March 17,  1856, in  Ft.  Claiborne.

Monroe  County,  Alabama.   On November 11, 1885, he married Lena

Anne Kirk,  born in Gay Hill,  Washington County,  Texas on  July 22,

1865, in  Waco, Texas.  He died on September 12, 1929  in Waco , Mc-

lennan  County . Texas as did his wife,  who died on  March  17, 1944.

Lena was the daughter of James Leonard Kirk and Emily O. Goodlett.

Charles D. Daniel  and  his  wife  were  appointed as  missionaries  of

FMB-SBC, on  May,14, 1885, to Brazil.  Here, they worked until  1892,

returning to the USA.


C. D. Daniel's parents were  Joseph Stephens Daniel and Anne Hazel

-tine Harrison.  Daniel,  along with  Camilla and  Drucilla  tried  to

emigrate  from the USA  to  Para,  after the Civil War, with  the agent,

Major · Lansford Warren Hastings. The steamship named 'Margaret”  that took them, with other passengers, had to return to the port of Moble, shortly after their departure on 25.03.1866, for having manifested smallpox on board. Eleven passengers died. (EJiJ. The.Confede rate Exodus to Latin America, by L. F. Hill, p. 33. Rare specimen at the National Library, Rio de Janeiro). On July 31, 1866, there was the entry into Rio de Janeiro of a "J. Daniel his brother, a son, 2 sisters and a brother-in-law", from New York.Ha 'o registr? leaving Rio de Janeiro for Santos, on 07.11.1866, of an "J. Daniel and his family". This information was found in the passenger lists published in the city's daily newspapers. In Santa Barbara, SP, there are three records of Purchase and Sale of a site, according to Book 12, p. 29 and 46; Book 15, p. 37 et seq. On December 11, 1866, Joseph Daniel buys it and on October 8, 1874 sells it, by demand. At the time of this sale, he and his family were already returning to the USA, as the date of the (Title) search was October 1,1872, in which it is said that he was temporarily withdrawing to the USA. . However, his name was not  on passenger lists leaving Rio de Janeiro. It is assumed that he and his family left the port of Santos directly for America, passing through Rio on October 26 or 27, 1872, as passengers in transit.

 

The parents above, Joseph and Anne, confirm the stay of the family of C. Daniel with the information that follows, concluding that he was in Santa Barbara from November 1866 to October. From 1872, more or less. '

 

After the Civil War, the father of C. D. Daniel emigrated to Brazil and settled in the Province of Sao Paulo. After 7 years he returned with his family to Navarro Co., Texas. USA. 1875, Charles's father passed away, leaving the responsibility of the family to his widowed mother and small brothers on this son's shoulders.

 

Charles's strongest religious impressions were those that were experienced during a storm on the trip to Brazil. At the time, he was a boy between 9 and 10 years old and the contrast of the calm confidence of the pious father with the that of the sailors, left him, certainly and well recorded, that God is the refuge.

 

_ At the time of his stay in Brazil, he had received education from his mother. He learned to speak Portuguese almost as fluently as his mother tongue, by living with the Brazilians while in Brazil.

 

At the age of 21, in the summer of 1877, Charles was converted and October 2.1877., Was baptized into the Bethesda Church, Richland Association, Corsicana, Navarro Coounty, Texas, by pastor E.R. Freeman. The desire to become a preacher of the Eangelho came into his heart, soon after. And also to return to Brazil. But his little preparation and lack of means and love the responsibility that · n.nha to take care of your family, in the absence of father, prevented him, immediately, to continue in his intent. But over time, he ended up enrolling at Waco University. While he was there  he  had the  opportunity to train himself  in preaching. On  November 4,.1883,  Charles Davis Daniel was con- secrated to the Ministry of the Word. He took over the pastorate of the Baptist Church in Dawson, Texas, which had, at the time, only 13 members. He also served part-time, at the Baptist Church in Lorraine, McLennan County Texas.

 

On June 13, 1988, he graduated from Waco University, and was appointed 'missionary to Brazil, by FMB-SBC.

 

Lena Kirk was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Kirk, Baptists. EJiJ. 1880, when she was at the University, she became a student of Anne Luther (Bagby) and it was from this contact that Lena felt her love for Missions.

 

For this summary, the information is contained from the following:

H. A. Tupper, A Decade of Foreign Missions 1880-1890, p. 85, 412, 413, 417-423, 425, 455, 477, 540, 630, 740, 741, and others, according to the contents of said book; also, MPRJ, p. 331, 368, 377.

 SOURCE:  Loosely translated and paraphrased from the original Portuguese manuscript.

CENTELHA   EM  RE STOLHO  SECO

Uma  Contribuiao  para  a  Hist6ria dos Prim6rdios do Trabalho Batista no Brasil    1985

Betty  Antunes  de Oliveira

DANIEL, CHARLES DAVIS (1856–1939).Charles Davis Daniel, Baptist missionary, was born in Monroe County, Alabama, on March 17, 1856. At the end of the Civil War his father took the family to Brazil. During their seven-year stay Daniel was educated by his mother and learned to speak Portuguese fluently. In 1872 he and his family moved to Navarro County, Texas. His father died three years later, and Daniel assumed responsibility as head of the household. In the summer of 1877 he joined the Bethesda Baptist Church of the Richland Association. He desired to teach but hesitated because of his lack of formal education and his responsibilities at home. He committed himself in 1880 to becoming a preacher and was licensed on July 31, 1881. In the fall of that year he entered Baylor University with the financial assistance of Baylor president R. C. Burleson. He studied Latin, Greek, and Spanish, in addition to the standard curriculum. While at Baylor Daniel met his future wife, Lena Kirk, and gained ministerial experience at the Dawson and Lorena Baptist churches. On November 4, 1883, he was ordained. He graduated from Baylor in June 1885 and was married in San Antonio in November.

After graduating he was appointed by the Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention as a missionary to Brazil. There he pastored several Baptist churches and edited the Brazilian Baptist, a newspaper. Two of his children were born during that time. He remained in Brazil until 1889, when his failing health necessitated his move back to the United States. For the next ten years he served churches in San Antonio and Mineola and did mission work among Mexican Americans. At the close of the Spanish-American War and the granting of Cuban independence by Spain in 1898, Daniel was appointed by the Home Mission Board to work as a missionary in Cuba. On the island he reorganized and revitalized Baptist work, which had deteriorated during the war. The four western provinces of Cuba were under his authority, including the city of Havana. Daniel remained in Cuba through 1905, when he returned to the United States due to ill health.

From 1906 to 1922 he was active in mission work among Hispanics in Texas. He spent the first few of these years in Gonzales and El Paso and later traveled around the state. In 1925 he returned to his former pastorate in Lorena, where he remained pastor as long as his health allowed. He was an active Mason for more than fifty years. On September 12, 1939, Daniel died in Waco after a long illness. He was survived by his wife, five children, three brothers, and nine grandchildren.

SOURCE:

Encyclopedia of Southern Baptists (4 vols., Nashville: Broadman, 1958–82).

DANIEL,

William James

 

 

 

 

 

 

The sons of William Robert Daniel and Margareth Elizabeth Thomas Daniel - Grandchildren of William James Daniel and Nancy Angeline Norrs Daniel - Great-grandchildren of William Hutchinson Norris and Mary Black Norris. Standing: Ruffus Edward Daniel (1902) Albert Downing Daniel (1899), Arlindo Allen Daniel (1890), Almeida Fredeick Daniel (1905) Seated: Robert Francis Daniel (1879), Luiz Guilherme Daniel (1886). This photo is missing John Thomas Daniel (* 08/03/03). Daniel Family Photo

DAVIS,

David

David Davis signed a Communiqué made by PIB / SB, sent to FMB, with a letter dated November 1, 1873. This fact led  put him in the list of members of the Church.  A portrait of a Davis family is published in the book SD, p. 114. and consists of the couple, a young man of about 15 years old and a girl of  7 years old. 

In the diary of the young Jeru Keyes, p. 252, there is a  reference to a Davis who, together with a Mcintyre, left the colony of Charles G. Gunter, in Rio Doce, ES, and went to Santa Barbara, SP, in 1868. We can risk saying that it was David Davis, but without proof.

On August 11, 1875, the Deed of Purchase and Sale, which is registered in Note Book No. 17, p. 48v, in the Notary's Office, in Santa Barbara, SP, it shows that David Davis and his wife Adeth Davis had acquired from Williaam H. Norris, a site called "Cinco Patentes", dividing with the property of this and Brazilians, in the term Campinas, with an address and some improvements. This property was probably part of the Fazenda Machadinho.

 SOURCE:  Loosely translated and paraphrased from the original Portuguese manuscript.

CENTELHA   EM  RE STOLHO  SECO

Uma  Contribuiao  para  a  Hist6ria dos Prim6rdios do Trabalho Batista no Brasil    1985

Betty  Antunes  de Oliveira

 

DeBERRY,

W. J.

Return to Alabama – Dissatisfied Emigrants to Brazil

August 10, 1867

There arrived at the Central Hotel last night a party of ladies and gentlemen who left Brazil last month, thoroughly, totally, heartily disgusted with their new homes among the hybrid masses in the overrated, well-flattered country of Brazil.  The party is composed entirely of Alabamians, among whom are MESSRS. JOHM M. HARRIS, W. J. DeBERRY, G. E. JONES, THOMAS McCANTS, T. A. McELROY, JOHN STANFIELD, D. W. BRAZIELL, and eighteen other gentlemen and their wives and children. They give affecting and pitiful accounts of the sufferings of many hundreds of deluded Southerners who were lured away from their friends by the tempting offers of the Brazilian Government, and the tales of wild and impulsive American adventurers.

 

They represent that there is no regularly organized Government in Brazil–there is no society–but little cultivation among the inhabitants–no laudable ambition–no ways of making money–the people scarcely know the meaning of the word “kindness”– the American citizens live about in huts, uncared for–there is general dissatisfaction among the emigrants, and the whole Brazil representation is a humbug and a farce. The American Consul is in receipt of numerous and constant applications from helpless American citizens to assist them in getting back to their true, rightful country. CAPT. JACK PHELAN, who is so well known and admired in Montgomery, has, we learn, left with a large number of other young men, to make California their home.  The advice of the gentlemen with whom we conversed is to dissipate the idea that Alabama is not still a great country – to cause dreaming over the unhappy past–say nothing that will assist to keep up political troubles, stay at home, but work, work, work, and Alabama will yet be, what she ought to be, and can be, a great and glorious country.

The long-deferred abolition of slavery in Brazil is to be hastened. A recent law releases all slaves after two years, and they are to receive wages during this period.  Brazil is the last country laying claim to civilization that still maintains slavery.  It is not sixty years since slavery was abolished in the British colonies, and less than half that time since this country rid itself of the evil.

SOURCES

New York Times, Aug. 15, 1867

Reprinted in the The South Alabamian, Jackson, Alabama, October 1, 1887

DEMARET,

Martin Felix

Martin Felix Demaret and his family never officially joined the McMullen colony even though made Mrs. Demaret and the children had sailed to Brazil on the same ship as the colonists all the way from Galveston. Demaret, a former resident of Louisiana, lived in Grimes County, Texas, for eleven years prior to his first trip to Brazil in 1866.  He traveled all over the empire from the Amazon river to São Paulo province and finally selected land near Santa Barbara, north west of the city of São Paulo. Convinced that he had made the correct decision in going to Brazil, Demaret proclaimed that he was now engaged in "selecting the best from the best". Demaret, his wife, and his children remained in Rio de Janeiro when the time came for their Texas friends to board ship for Iguape. George Barnsley had high praise for Demaret, describing him as a "fine gentleman, of the old, courteous, gallant type, and his family well educated and thoroughly refined in manner, which later merits were very much at discount among most of our American immigrants of that epoch."

SOURCE:The Elusive Eden,  Page 88

 

 

DILLARD,

Unknown

 

Dillard, . Dillard, whose first name is not mentioned in any of the extant records, sailed on the Derby to Rio de Janeiro. With another young Irish boy named O'Reilly who joined the McMullan party in New York City in search of adventure, Dillard enlisted in the Brazilian army during the war with Paraguay. Both Dillard and O'Reilly collected the large bonuses offered to enlistees, but once on the front lines, they deserted and joined the Paraguayans to collect another bounty. Afterwards, they were captured by the Brazilians, tried by court-martial, and shot.

Source: Griggs Thesis

DODSON,

Henry Hill

Charles Dodson, Husband of Bertie Seawright, went to South America with a group of the Seawrights. When he got there he found that the climate was so much like South Carolina that he sent back home for cotton seeds. He became the first person to introduce cotton to Brazil.

Drefus relates this story:

Before WWI, two beautiful young sisters arrived in Donalds, SC., from Brazil, South America. They came to further their education in South Carolina's more modern system of higher learning. They were admired and welcomed by their many cousins whom they had never seen.

The girls were the granddaughters of Ebenezer Wilson Seawright who moved to Brazil after the Civil War.

Katherine and Rosa Keese are the ladies I am thinking of. It didn't take long for them to fit right in with the young folks and be admired and praised by the older people. Customs here were very different from their homeland, but that didn't take the girls long to over come. The proms and lawn parties of that day made getting acquainted easy. Dating and college went hand in hand.

Katherine was the first to go steady. The local young druggist and drug store owner was the lucky man. Robert D. Brownlee popped the question and Katherine accepted. We soon heard wedding bells echoing through-out the little town of Donalds.

Two fine children were born to this family, one boy and one girl, William A. Brownlee and Dorothy Brownlee (Henry).

Rosa also had a sweetheart and they were very serious at that time.

Rosa and Henry Dodson were engaged but their plans were very cloudy by the approach of WWI. Henry had been drafted and Uncle Sam had made his plans. So they postponed the wedding until a later date. Rosa hurriedly left for Brazil before the German U-boats cut off the shipping lanes to her home. The story does not end yet. Poor old Henry reluctantly marched off to war in Germany. Finally after two long years the war ended and Henry set foot on American soil again, but not for long. After visiting relatives he headed to Charleston, SC, and caught the first boat headed to Sao Paulo, Brazil. You guessed it, the wedding took place as planned. One fine boy was born to Henry and Rosa. They named him C.K. I suppose that stood for Charles Keese Dodson. Neither Henry nor Rosa ever returned to America.

Charles davis Daniel.jpg
William Robert Daniel  group.jpg
Demaret Broadnax.jpg
Henry Dodson.jpg
The Greenville News
August 30, 1936  Sunday Thursday
Page  9
Charlie Dodson.jpg
The Greenville News
May 2, 1957  Thursday
Page 2

E

EZELL,

Dr. C. P.

F

FENLEY

Pleasant M.

 

Pleasant M. Fenley and his wife Sarah A. Blair Fenley came to Brazil bringing the children Charles Columbus (born 1859), P. P.A. Fenley “Pulaski” (born 1847), Hulda V. (born 1851), Sarah L. (born 1849), and Elisabeth B. (born 1849). They were married, respectively, to Eugenia Minchin, Mary Virginia Carlton, John Rowe, John Rowe (for this, second marriage), and John Carlton. All of these have their burials at the Cemiterio do Campo, in Santa Barbara, SP. They were natives of Edgefield, South Carolina, in the USA, but, at the time of coming to Brazil, they were residing in Mariana, Jackson County, Florida, having moved there after the 1850 census probably in 1851 as that is where and when daughter Hulda was born. They were a family of Baptists.

 

Pleasant M. Fenley passed away in Santa Barbara,  SP, on December 3, 1885, at the age of 70. At that time he was a pastor of PIB / SB, missionary Edwin H. So per • . The inscription in the title of Pleasant M. Fenley's title reveals that he was a member of a Baptist church for years and had died firmly in faith. On the gravestone, the Masonic sign is seen, thus designating his affiliation to the Masonic Order.

From the inscription of Sarah A., wife of PM Fenley, we have that she was the daughter of CC and SA Blair, born on August 19, 1819, and died on 2 January 29, 1879, also in Santa Barbara, being a member of a Baptist church. for 45 years.

 

On December 28, 1980, Rev. Richard Ratcliff sent a letter from Texas to FMB on the issue related to the problem that arose between workers Quillin and Teixeira de Albuquerque. Ratcliff mentioned PM Fenley's sons and his son-in-law, John Rowe, as sincere and trustworthy men, able to help solve the problem. Both were members and devotees at the time of the State Baptist Church; the second.

 

The exact date of the Fenley family's arrival in Brazil is unknown,.  It is likely during the years 1869/1870.

It is said that before living in Santa Barbara, the family was in Parana; At the Campinas Forum, in the Intake da "Distribuiao" we find the record of a Script of Purchase and Sale, Book 9, p. 25, 15.06.1881, by Alexandr € 'and Charles Fenley passing to Dr, Jorge Green Mattheus, 35 bushels of land. We find below the records of Purchase and Sale of land between Alexandre Fenley, Charles Fenley, and Guilherme Norris, Booklet of Scriptures 16, p. 13, 10.10.1888; P. 26, 12.01.1889; P. 28, 01.22.1889. In the-Book No. 13, p. 44, 06.08.1886, and distributes "Escritura" of sharing signed by Alexandre Fenley, his brothers, and brothers-in-law of the goods left by the late Pleasant Fenley ". The house that Charles Fenley built, now repaired and a little modified can be seen on the way out of the city of Americana going to Nova Odessa. There is a restaurant in it "A Gazela".

 SOURCE:  Loosely translated and paraphrased from the original Portuguese manuscript.

CENTELHA   EM  RE STOLHO  SECO

Uma  Contribuiao  para  a  Hist6ria dos Prim6rdios do Trabalho Batista no Brasil    1985

Betty  Antunes  de Oliveira

Pleasant M Fenley

BIRTH 1815 • South Carolina, USA

DEATH 3 DECEMBER 1885 • Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Married:  1846

Sarah Agnes Blair

BIRTH 19 AUG 1819 • Edgefield County, South Carolina, USA

DEATH 29 JAN 1879 • Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Children:

1.

Pleasant Pulaski Fenley

BIRTH 4 AUGUST 1847 • South Carolina

DEATH 27 AUGUST 1890 • Brazil

Married:

Mary Virginia Carlton

BIRTH 18 JAN 1858 • , , Mississippi, USA

DEATH 18 NOV 1951 • Brazil

2.

Sarah L Fenley

BIRTH ABT 1849 • South Carolina

DEATH Unknown

Married:

John Henry Rowe

BIRTH 22 FEB 1846 • Gadsden County, Florida, USA

DEATH 16 DEC 1922 • Sao Paulo São Paulo, Brazil

Son of Stephen Hiram Rowe and Nancy Bird

They are not recorded as having children

3.

Elizabeth B Fenley

BIRTH 25 APR 1849 • Edgefield, Edgefield, South Carolina

DEATH 22 JULY 1910 • Brazil

Married: 

John Alexander Carlton

BIRTH 28 NOV 1846 • Warsaw Sumpter County, Alabama, USA

DEATH 9 NOV 1922 • Brazil

Son of Richard G. and Cynthia Elizabeth Carlton 

               Elizabeth and John had at least five children,

                all born in Brazil

                1.  Chaeles D. Carlton

                2.  Alberta A. Carlton

                3.  Eula V. Carlton

                4.  Alice s. Carlton

                5.  John E. Carlton

4.

Hulda V Fenley

BIRTH 6 MAY 1851 • Florida, USA

DEATH 14 SEP 1890 • Sao Paulo São Paulo, Brazil

Married:  1875 • Sao Paulo, Brazil

John Henry Rowe

BIRTH 22 FEB 1846 • Gadsden County, Florida, USA

DEATH 16 DEC 1922 • Sao Paulo São Paulo, Brazil

Son of Stephen Hiram Rowe and Nancy Bird

He married secondly Hulda's older sister Sarah L Fenley

                Hulda and John had at least six children:

                1.  Charles P. Rowe  (1876-1941)

                2.  Stephen P. Rowe  (1878-1897)

                3.  John Franklin "Frank" Rowe

                     BIRTH 12/12/1879 • Santa Barbara, Sao Paulo, Brazil

                     DEATH 6/29/1930 • Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil

                     Married:  17 Dec 1903 • Brazil

                     Eula Lee Kennerly

                     BIRTH 20 FEB 1883 • Santa Barbara DOeste, Sao, Brazil

                     DEATH JUN 1967

                     Daughter of John Conrad Kennerly and Elizabeth Ann

                     Hetherwick

                                John and Eula would have at least three children:

                                1.  Evelyn Augusta Rowe  (1905-????)

                                2.  Nina Ethel Rowe  (1907-2005)

                                3.  Henry Rowe  (1905-????)

                4.  Lee Rowe  (1880-????)

                5.  Arthur Ernest Rowe 

                     BIRTH 1 MAR 1881 • , Usa

                     DEATH 22 MAR 1948 • Sao Paulo São Paulo, Brazil

                     Married:

                     Minerva "Minnie" Carlton Seawright

                     BIRTH 07 MAY 1885 

                     DEATH 4 MAY 1964 • Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

                     Daughter of Eugene Virgil Seawright and Anna Elizabeth

                     "Bettie" Carlton

                                Arthur and Minnies would have at least five children

                                     (2 listed)

                                1.  Stephen Gordon Rowe  (1915- 1977)

                                     Married

                                     Elga Bradley

                                2. James L. Rowe  (1927-1947) 

                6.  Laura V. Rowe

5.

Charles Columbus Fenley

BIRTH 10 JUNE 1859 • Mariana, Jackson County, Florida, USA

DEATH 29 MAY 1935 • Villa Americana, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Married:

Eugenia "Jenny" Minchin

BIRTH 18 OCT 1869 • Brazil

DEATH 23 MAY 1957 • Brazil

Daughter of Joseph Long Minchin and Julia Antoinette Pyles

Charles and Jenny had at least five children

1.  

Hiram M. Fenley

1892–1933

2.

Vivian Urania Fenley

BIRTH 16 JAN 1894 • Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 1963 • Nova Odessa, São Paulo, Brazil

Married:  10 May 1917 • Americana, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Jefferson Lafayette Keese

BIRTH 01 JAN 1891 • Jaú, Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 13 JAN 1955 • Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil

1.  

Jenie Matilda Keese

BIRTH 19 MAR 1918 • Campinas, São Paulo, Brasil

DEATH 17 APR 1971

Married:  19 Aug 1941 • São Paulo, Brasil

G

GUILLET,

Judge John

DeBow’s Review, January 1866 by Dr John H Blue:


Judge John Guillet, an old and highly-esteemed citizen of Carroll county, with several families, and a Mr. Reavia, of Cooper county, Missouri, with his interesting family, are now here (August), making about forty Americans in all, the nucleus of a good settlement around Colonel M.L. Swain, of Louisiana, who has located and paid for a body of land on the Assunguy, a branch of the Serra-Negro river, which empties into this bay from the northwest, and which is the only practicable route to the mines, and to the rich open country beyond. We already have houses and a little store, and will soon have a little blacksmith shop and a school house, the Government giving us five hundred milreis a year to support a school. We have small crops of corn, beans, and potatoes, growing finely, and expect to keep ahead of the wants of new-comers, in the way of food.All of this dates from about the time that I came into the bay, a period, a period of less than three months.

Page 1.jpg
Page 1.jpg
Page 1.jpg
Nina Rowe.jpg
Vivian Fenley.jpg
J L Keese.jpg

H

HARRIS

John M.

Return to Alabama – Dissatisfied Emigrants to Brazil

August 10, 1867

There arrived at the Central Hotel last night a party of ladies and gentlemen who left Brazil last month, thoroughly, totally, heartily disgusted with their new homes among the hybrid masses in the overrated, well-flattered country of Brazil.  The party is composed entirely of Alabamians, among whom are MESSRS. JOHM M. HARRIS, W. J. DeBERRY, G. E. JONES, THOMAS McCANTS, T. A. McELROY, JOHN STANFIELD, D. W. BRAZIELL, and eighteen other gentlemen and their wives and children. They give affecting and pitiful accounts of the sufferings of many hundreds of deluded Southerners who were lured away from their friends by the tempting offers of the Brazilian Government, and the tales of wild and impulsive American adventurers.

 

They represent that there is no regularly organized Government in Brazil–there is no society–but little cultivation among the inhabitants–no laudable ambition–no ways of making money–the people scarcely know the meaning of the word “kindness”– the American citizens live about in huts, uncared for–there is general dissatisfaction among the emigrants, and the whole Brazil representation is a humbug and a farce. The American Consul is in receipt of numerous and constant applications from helpless American citizens to assist them in getting back to their true, rightful country. CAPT. JACK PHELAN, who is so well known and admired in Montgomery, has, we learn, left with a large number of other young men, to make California their home.  The advice of the gentlemen with whom we conversed is to dissipate the idea that Alabama is not still a great country – to cause dreaming over the unhappy past–say nothing that will assist to keep up political troubles, stay at home, but work, work, work, and Alabama will yet be, what she ought to be, and can be, a great and glorious country.

The long-deferred abolition of slavery in Brazil is to be hastened. A recent law releases all slaves after two years, and they are to receive wages during this period.  Brazil is the last country laying claim to civilization that still maintains slavery.  It is not sixty years since slavery was abolished in the British colonies, and less than half that time since this country rid itself of the evil.

SOURCE:

New York Times, Aug. 15, 1867

Reprinted in the The South Alabamian, Jackson, Alabama, October 1, 1887

HENDERSON,

Mr. Henderson was a bachelor travelong with the New Texas group to Rio.  ..... A Mr. Henderson also stayed in Rio, wher he adopted a little Brazilian orphan girl.  Henderson and his new daughter remained in Brazilonly afewmonths before they returned to Texas.  There, the young  lady was educated in North American ways and the English laguage.  When grown, she married her foster father.....

 

SOURCE:  The Elusive Eden,  Page 88 

HOBGOOD,

John W.

James Alexander Marchant and John W. Hobgood of Louisiana

 

Like many southern migrants, Bridget to Brazil, John W, Hopgood of Louisiana had had enough of” that miserable country” by the mid-1869 and returned to the United States with his family. He had gone to Brazil in the company of his brother-in-law James Alexander Marchant. Hobgood’s and Marchant’s wives, Melissa and Louisiana, were two of three DeArmond sisters.  After leaving Brazil, Hobgood wrote to Marchant urging him to return in a letter that provides one of the most explicit pieces of evidence that Freemasons were behind-the-scenes facilitators of both migration and repatriation.

 

Well-written evidence of Masonic involvement in advancing migration efforts is frustratingly scant, a significant number of the southern man who relocated to Brazil were known to be members of that organization. In Hobgood’s case, the information comes in a letter written from New York, the family’s port of entry..” I found a great many friends here who have befriended me. We landed here without a cent but I soon found out that we would be taken care of. We were taken to a tavern and our bill paid until we can get away from here. I went to a Masonic meeting last Saturday night and told them my situation and they gave me money enough to go to New Orleans and where I will make other arrangements. I think 10 days more will land me safe at home.”

 

The Hobgoods could have remained a New York as “the people”  who helped them were “anxious” for them to do so. The family could “do well” there, John could earn four dollars a day and Melissa two dollars. But she wanted to her see her ill mother, so the family returned to Clinton, Louisiana. John's brother-in-law James Alexander Marchant was a Louisiana native, although he is sometimes identified as being from Charleston, South Carolina. He was a planter in East Feliciana Parish. His wife, Louisiana, was a descendant of the Yarbroough and Felps families who had located here in the late 1700s. One of her grandmothers donated the land on which the town of Clinton was founded. The Marchants lived with a Mrs. M. Carr who was a South Carolinian and the titular head of the household, owning $6,000 of real estate and another $6,000 worth of personal estate in 1860. In the greater scheme of antebellum plantations, these are not impressive figures, but in East Feliciana Parish, this level of wealth was at the upper end of the scale.

 

But margins Masonic affiliations are unequivocal.  Their eldest son, John James, was a student in the “Primary Department” at the Masonic Male Academy of Clinton in 1866. In 1867, the Marchants were invited to Washington's birthday “Grand Mask and Fancy Dress Ball” at the Masonic Hall. : George Washington was a major Masonic figure of his day.). Among the committee members extending the invitation was Frank D'Armond and among the “managers” of the affair was O.. P. ( Owens Palmer) Langworthy, a physician from Ohio who had been in Louisiana since 1853. The Merchants admired him greatly and named one of their sons Langworthy.

 

Once James Alexander Marchant got to Brazil, he never left. The family (including Mrs. Carr), resided in the Santa Barbara – Campinas vicinity for many years, although Marchant was living in RIO at the time of his death. The Marchants probably felt added satisfaction with their decision to say when Louisiana received a letter in 1872 for my friend who had returned: “I am indeed glad to know that you are all satisfied down there, I only wish we had never left Brazil. I would return tomorrow if it were possible. Business is at present very dull here, owing partly to hard times, and partly to the summer months. Complaints are heard on all sides, and the cry for Money, Money, is heard in every direction. A great many large houses have failed this season.”.

 

Later in the 1870s, the Marchant’s son Langworthy and James McFadden Gaston Junior, whose father had been so instrumental in bringing southerners to Brazil, shared a composition book, in which they wrote in French and Portuguese. In the late 1940s, James Alexander Marchant’s grandson Alexander Marchant became a founding faculty member of a Brazilian studies center at Vanderbilt University, the first of its kind in the United States. His granddaughter Anita was an official with the Inter-American Development Bank.

 

SOURCE:  A Confluence of Transatlantic Networks  Pages 199-201

I

J

JONES,

G. E.

Return to Alabama – Dissatisfied Emigrants to Brazil

August 10, 1867

There arrived at the Central Hotel last night a party of ladies and gentlemen who left Brazil last month, thoroughly, totally, heartily disgusted with their new homes among the hybrid masses in the overrated, well-flattered country of Brazil.  The party is composed entirely of Alabamians, among whom are MESSRS. JOHM M. HARRIS, W. J. DeBERRY, G. E. JONES, THOMAS McCANTS, T. A. McELROY, JOHN STANFIELD, D. W. BRAZIELL, and eighteen other gentlemen and their wives and children. They give affecting and pitiful accounts of the sufferings of many hundreds of deluded Southerners who were lured away from their friends by the tempting offers of the Brazilian Government, and the tales of wild and impulsive American adventurers.

 

They represent that there is no regularly organized Government in Brazil–there is no society–but little cultivation among the inhabitants–no laudable ambition–no ways of making money–the people scarcely know the meaning of the word “kindness”– the American citizens live about in huts, uncared for–there is general dissatisfaction among the emigrants, and the whole Brazil representation is a humbug and a farce. The American Consul is in receipt of numerous and constant applications from helpless American citizens to assist them in getting back to their true, rightful country. CAPT. JACK PHELAN, who is so well known and admired in Montgomery, has, we learn, left with a large number of other young men, to make California their home.  The advice of the gentlemen with whom we conversed is to dissipate the idea that Alabama is not still a great country – to cause dreaming over the unhappy past–say nothing that will assist to keep up political troubles, stay at home, but work, work, work, and Alabama will yet be, what she ought to be, and can be, a great and glorious country.

The long-deferred abolition of slavery in Brazil is to be hastened. A recent law releases all slaves after two years, and they are to receive wages during this period.  Brazil is the last country laying claim to civilization that still maintains slavery.  It is not sixty years since slavery was abolished in the British colonies, and less than half that time since this country rid itself of the evil.

SOURCE

New York Times, Aug. 15, 1867

Reprinted in the The South Alabamian, Jackson, Alabama, October 1, 1887

K

KEESE, 

Thomas Lafayette

Drefus relates this story:

Before WWI, two beautiful young sisters arrived in Donalds, SC., from Brazil, South America. They came to further their education in South Carolina's more modern system of higher learning. They were admired and welcomed by their many cousins whom they had never seen.

The girls were the granddaughters of Ebenezer Wilson Seawright who moved to Brazil after the Civil War.

Katherine and Rosa Keese are the ladies I am thinking of. It didn't take long for them to fit right in with the young folks and be admired and praised by the older people. Customs here were very different from their homeland, but that didn't take the girls long to over come. The proms and lawn parties of that day made getting acquainted easy. Dating and college went hand in hand.

Katherine was the first to go steady. The local young druggist and drug store owner was the lucky man. Robert D. Brownlee popped the question and Katherine accepted. We soon heard wedding bells echoing through-out the little town of Donalds.

Two fine children were born to this family, one boy and one girl, William A. Brownlee and Dorothy Brownlee (Henry).

Rosa also had a sweetheart and they were very serious at that time.

Rosa and Henry Dodson were engaged but their plans were very cloudy by the approach of WWI. Henry had been drafted and Uncle Sam had made his plans. So they postponed the wedding until a later date. Rosa hurriedly left for Brazil before the German U-boats cut off the shipping lanes to her home. The story does not end yet. Poor old Henry reluctantly marched off to war in Germany. Finally after two long years the war ended and Henry set foot on American soil again, but not for long. After visiting relatives he headed to Charleston, SC, and caught the first boat headed to Sao Paulo, Brazil. You guessed it, the wedding took place as planned. One fine boy was born to Henry and Rosa. They named him C.K. I suppose that stood for Charles Keese Dodson. Neither Henry nor Rosa ever returned to America.

Dorothy Brownlee

A 1936 graduate of Erskine College, Due West, SC, she taught schools in Georgia, and later studied nursing at the Capital City School of Nursing in Washington, D.C., where she received her RN certificate in 1942. She was a retired Supervisor at the University of Texas Hospital in Galveston, TX. 

Preceded in death by her husband, Louis Carr Henry in 1983; her parents, Robert & Katherine Keese Brownlee; brother and sister-in-law, Bill & Lois Brownlee, and their daughter, Evelyn.

Survivors include daughter, Margaret C. "Peg" Henry; son and daughter-in-law, Alexander Brownlee Henry & Marie Quick Henry; grandchildren, Katharine Hunter Henry & Christopher Carr Henry.

Interment in the Church graveyard followed funeral services conducted Saturday, January 5, 2008.

KEITH,

James Monroe

James Monroe Keith, part of the New Texas group,  sought gold and did not choose to stay with the agriculturalists of the McMullen party.  A former Texas Ranger and Confederate soldier, Keith briefly remained in Rio, rather than go to Iguape, he then set out on his own into the sertao to find his fortune.

.......

In 1921 James M. Keith, George Barnsley’s old friend and partner in a score of mining ventures, died in the home of one Antonio Exel in Sorocaba. Keith passed away at about 85 years of age, with a cause of death officially listed as “la grippe”, cardio pulmonary form. His only relatives were listed as Edward Currie, a nephew from Meridian, Mississippi. The U.S. Consul who signed Keith’s death certificate stated that “Keith was poor, but had a large grant of land from the Brazilian government worth possibly $5,000. He was possibly a naturalized citizen.  Has no relatives in Brazil. Died intestate.” The civil code of Brazil stated that when heirs of an interstate decedent were unknown, the property could not be disposed of for two years. After that time, the property could be sold and proceeds placed in the state treasury. The money received could be claimed by relative for a period of up to thirty years. Despite the law, Keith’s land was disposed of immediately after his death. Despite inquiries by E. M. Lawton, the American Council. Brazilians would not disclose the amount for which Keith’s property was sold.

Several of Keith's heirs, through attorneys and individually, carried on an extensive correspondence with US consular authorities for about two years after Keith’s death. Their inquiries produced no results, however, as U.S. authorities did not believe that the value of the property was sufficient to pay attorneys fees,

In one letter, Consul Lawton pointed out that there was not even a lawyer in Sorocaba, the place of Keith’s death, and that he could not employ one in Sao Paulo without advance guarantees of fees and cost. “Frankly,” he stated to an American attorney, “I question very much if it is worthwhile for your clients to take further action.”  Thus, the estate of James Monroe Keith, which he had labored so many years to create, was dissolved within days.

SOURCE:

The Elusive Eden, William Clark Griggs, 1987, pages 143-144

KENNEDY

Rev. James Lillbourne

 the patriarch, Rev. James Skidmore Kennedy (1826-1905). The TN Kennedys are descendants of the Ayrshire, Scotland clan, and his great-grandfather likely came to America early- to mid-1700s. Rev. Kennedy was born in Madison County, VA, one of seven known children. Around 1846, already with a classical education from a school near his home, James traveled 300 miles by stage to enter Emory & Henry. He graduated with a B.A. in 1849 and went on to earn a Masters degree from Emory & Henry and a Doctor of Divinity from Wofford College in Spartanburg, SC. In 1851, he married Melinda Stringfield (1833-1905), daughter of a Methodist minister in Strawberry Plains, TN. Melinda was educated at the East Tennessee Female Institute in Knoxville.

The Kennedy family reflects the Methodist Church’s early influence on American education. John Wesley, Oxford-educated teacher, priest and founder of Methodism, appointed the first Methodist minister to America in 1738. The 26-year-old John Asbury spent 54 years spreading Methodism, sometimes riding an average of 6,000 miles a year. His journeys spanned some ten states, MA to GA. He ordained numerous new itinerant ministers, the first circuit riding preachers. Under his leadership, the church grew from 1,200 to 214,000 members and 700 ordained preachers(1) and, by 1900, had grown to be the largest Protestant denomination. When those ministers settled in an area, usually because of marrying a local, they founded schools. These schools were open to anyone who could afford the nominal fees or acquired scholarships, including females and blacks (Asbury ordained the first black minister in the US).

Rev. Kennedy spent 56 years as a teacher and Methodist preacher in TN, NC and VA. He was recognized as one of the most scholarly men of the Holston Conference. He was president of Holston Female College for ten years and also president of Strawberry Plains College 1857-59. The SPC was an example of the structure and well-rounded curriculum of the Methodist schools of that era. The college history on the Jefferson County History website reads:

"Strawberry Plains College was founded by the Rev. Creed Fulton and the Methodist Church and opened on July 4, 1848, with Rev. Thomas Stringfield (Melinda’s father) as superintendent. The five acres on which the college was built were donated from Rev. Stringfield's farm. The college was incorporated in 1850. Located on the main road 15 miles east of Knoxville, it was probably a modern high school, but young men from TN and surrounding states attended the college.

"Tuition began at $5.00-$10.00 per session. The college was composed of a large center building with two wings. Students often arrived by train and stayed with nearby families for $1.25-$1.50 each week. A spacious boarding house was finished by 1855’s fall quarter providing facilities for students that few colleges of the day offered. Tuition, in advance for five months’ session, costs $10-$15. The cost of room and board was $30, fuel costs were $2, and washing costs an additional $2. It had the largest library in the region. The college offered a comprehensive and thorough course of study. Some of the courses offered for study were: elementary English grammar, advanced grammar, geography, composition, bookkeeping, penmanship, philosophy, astronomy, mathematics, chemistry, science, theology, Constitution of the U.S., algebra, advanced algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, and classical Latin and Greek. A telescope was even ordered for viewing the eclipses of Jupiter’s moons."

The Kennedys had ten children. Their eldest son, James Lillbourne Kennedy, was born in Strawberry Plains in 1857 and served as a Methodist missionary  in Brazil for  54 years. He died in  São  Paulo in 1952.

The eldest daughter, Caroline (Carrie) A. Kennedy (1852-1918) attended and taught at Ashe-

ville  emale College, NC, and in  TN and   VA schools and worked eleven years as assistant to

the secretary of the  Women’s  Board of Foreign Missions in  Nashville, TN.  She never mar-

ried,  retired  in  Roanoke,  VA, and is  buried in  St. Clair  Cemetery  near there.  Daughters

Fannie and Mollie  (Mary  Burrus  Kennedy) were also missionaries and teachers in  Brazil.

Mary is buried in Old  Gray;  Fannie is  buried  Gaithersburg,  MD.  James Lillbourne’s dau-

ghters  Eula  and Jennie,   graduates of  Randolph-Macon  Women’s  College in  Lynchburg,

VA,  were  also  missionaries   and  teachers in  Brazil.  Jennie,  who never  married, is  also

buried in Old Gray;  Eula is buried with her husband Frank Long in Salem, VA.

Rev. James S. & Melinda Kennedy spent their last months with their son, Edwin M. Kennedy

and wife Sarah in Knoxville. Edwin was also born in Strawberry Plains, was president of the

Morris Plan Bank for 27 years, and lived on Morningside Drive off Dandridge Avenue in hist-

oric

East Knoxville. He and Sarah are also buried in Old Gray.

1 Francis Asbury, Wikipedia
2 Ref. “History of the Hume, Kennedy and Brockman Families”

by William Everett Brockman

Rev. James L. Kennedy  married on   29 Oct., 1918  in Santa  Barbara  d'Oeste,  SP,  Brazil 

Daisy Ellis Pyles, daughter of  Adomiran Judson Pyles and Josephine Frances MacKnight.

  They would have one son, Embree Moore Kennedy, BIRTH 27 OCT 1919 • Rio de Janeiro,

Brazil, DEATH 12 JAN 2010 • Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

James,, :BIRTH 31 DEC 1857 • Strawberry Plains, Jefferson, Tennessee, USA, DEATH 07 ,

DEC

1942 • Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil of prostate cancer.and buried at Cemitério do Redemptor 

São Paulo, Município de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Daisy: BIRTH OCT 1882 • Capivari, SP, Brazil, DEATH 06 JUL 1970 • Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.

The following biography was written in 1916 before Rev. James Kennedy's second marriage to Daisy E. Pyles 

REV. JAMES LILLBOURNE KENNEDY (5) was born at Strawberry Plains, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1857. He has been a missionary to Brazil since 1881. He was educated in Wofford and Weaverville Colleges, graduating in 1877 from the latter institution in the State of North Carolina. He entered the ministry of the M. E. Church South in 1878, and offered his services a few years later to the Board of Foreign Missions of that church. He was accepted and appointed to Brazil, sailing March 2, 1881. Two years later he returned to his native land to recuperate from a severe attack of yellow fever. While at home he was married to Miss Jennie Wallace, daughter of Robert Wallace and wife Harriet. Miss Wallace was born Jan. 16, 1858, near Knoxville, Tenn. Her education was acquired in private schools, and at Branner Institute, Mossy Creek, now known as Jefferson City, Tenn. She was an attractive person and lovely in character. After her marriage to Mr. Kennedy, they returned to the field, where she soon became ardently attached to the work. For nearly thirty years she was a model wife and mother; most faithful and helpful to her husband, and to her he attributed much of his success. Side by side they ministered to all classes around them, but she was especially devoted to women and children. Failing health called her home in the fall of 1912. The best medical aid proved without avail, and she died Jan. 1, 1913, and was buried in Old Gray Cemetery, Knoxville, Tenn.

The following summary of Rev. James L. Kennedy's work is from the pen of Bishop W. R. Lambuth, and was written two years ago: "Mr. Kennedy has frequently taken active part in directing the construction of our church buildings in Brazil. He has translated into Portuguese and published a book of Wesley's Sermons; the larger Wesleyan Catechism; assisted in the translation of our Ritual, which he published, as well as one edition of our Discipline. He compiled and published a Life of Wesley, besides a number of Gospel Facts. He has been a faithful, indefatigable worker, ever holding aloft the Banner of the Cross wherever duty called him. During his missionary life of thirty-two years, he has been superintendent of the entire mission for one year; presiding elder for thirteen years; pastor on stations and circuits, twenty-three years; editor of the Conference Weekly, eleven years; Sunday School editor, four years; agent of the Publishing House, and book editor, two years; president of the Annual Conference, once; delegate to the General Conference, which convened in Birmingham, Ala., in 1906. He is now (1913), president of the Sao Paulo Sunday School Convention. On July 12, 1913, in company with his daughter, Miss Eula Lee Kennedy, his sister, Miss Mary B. Kennedy, Bishop Lambuth, and other missionaries and friends, Mr. Kennedy embarked again for his work, in the 'Land of the Southern Cross', there to continue, he hopes, with still greater success, the work to which he has devoted himself since he was twenty-three years old".

Rev. James L. Kennedy and Jennie Wallace were married May 16, 1883.

Their children are as follows:

1. Eula Lee Kennedy, born at Taubate, Brazil, Sept. 25, 1893.

She married on October 13, 1914, Frank Millard Long,
formerly of Oklahoma, U. S. A., but now Y. M. C. A.
Secretary and teacher in Granberry College, Juiz de Fora,
Brazil. Mrs. Long finished her education at Randolph-
Macon Women's College, Lynchburg, Va.

2. Jennie Ruth Kennedy, born in Knoxville, Tenn., March 4,

1894. She was educated there and at Randolph-Macon

Women's College. Miss Kennedy is now

a teacher at McKenzie College, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

3. James Wallace Kennedy, 

born at Taubate, Brazil, Aug. 11, 1895. He is now a student in the University

of Tennessee.

SOURCE: 

History of the Hume, Kennedy and Brockman Families: In Three Parts    1916    Page 20

By William Everett Brockman

L

James Kennedy.jpg
Daisy Pyles.jpg
Enree Kennedy.jpg
Jennie Kennedy.jpg

M

 

McCANN

William T.

William T. McCann was a close friend of the Mcknight family.  He elected to stay in Rio after the group's arrival in Brazil with his fiends, whose daughter, Emma McKnight was seriously ill.

SOURCE:  The Elusive Eden,  Page 87

McCANTS.

Thomas

Return to Alabama – Dissatisfied Emigrants to Brazil

August 10, 1867

There arrived at the Central Hotel last night a party of ladies and gentlemen who left Brazil last month, thoroughly, totally, heartily disgusted with their new homes among the hybrid masses in the overrated, well-flattered country of Brazil.  The party is composed entirely of Alabamians, among whom are MESSRS. JOHM M. HARRIS, W. J. DeBERRY, G. E. JONES, THOMAS McCANTS, T. A. McELROY, JOHN STANFIELD, D. W. BRAZIELL, and eighteen other gentlemen and their wives and children. They give affecting and pitiful accounts of the sufferings of many hundreds of deluded Southerners who were lured away from their friends by the tempting offers of the Brazilian Government, and the tales of wild and impulsive American adventurers.

 

They represent that there is no regularly organized Government in Brazil–there is no society–but little cultivation among the inhabitants–no laudable ambition–no ways of making money–the people scarcely know the meaning of the word “kindness”– the American citizens live about in huts, uncared for–there is general dissatisfaction among the emigrants, and the whole Brazil representation is a humbug and a farce. The American Consul is in receipt of numerous and constant applications from helpless American citizens to assist them in getting back to their true, rightful country. CAPT. JACK PHELAN, who is so well known and admired in Montgomery, has, we learn, left with a large number of other young men, to make California their home.  The advice of the gentlemen with whom we conversed is to dissipate the idea that Alabama is not still a great country – to cause dreaming over the unhappy past–say nothing that will assist to keep up political troubles, stay at home, but work, work, work, and Alabama will yet be, what she ought to be, and can be, a great and glorious country.

The long-deferred abolition of slavery in Brazil is to be hastened. A recent law releases all slaves after two years, and they are to receive wages during this period.  Brazil is the last country laying claim to civilization that still maintains slavery.  It is not sixty years since slavery was abolished in the British colonies, and less than half that time since this country rid itself of the evil.

SOURCES

New York Times, Aug. 15, 1867

Reprinted in the The South Alabamian, Jackson, Alabama, October 1, 1887

From :  robertstapleton@tripod.com

The McCants Letters

(Excerpted)

....John McCants and his brother, Thomas, came from South Carolina from the Darlington District about the year 1800 and settled in the lower edge of Wilcox County on the land now occupied by Mr. Daniel J. McCarty, a ruling elder in this church. At this time John McCants had a son, Thomas, who was about four years of age, destined late to be a Ruling Elder in the Presbyterian church for year. Near their home in or before the year 1816 a hewn log house was built for a church,in which they worshiped until about the year 1819. Probably in the year 1819 a discussion arose as to the ownership of the ground on which the log church was erected, originally settled by Thomas McCants, Sr., which was not legally entered by him. A neighbor, Peter McArthur, procured government titles to the property and thus brought on a dispute. Tradition states that the church session met to determine the true ownership of the land where upon Peter McArthur secured his claim. This judgment so angered Thomas McCants that he withdrew from the Presbyterian Church and united with the Methodist Church......

.....There were eighteen members in the reorganized body, with Dr. William Jenkins, Mr. Thomas McCants and Mr. David H Packer as Ruling Elders.....

.....As the old church records up to 1888 were burned, probably in the old Hunt Hotel in Brewton, Alabama, these items of history are necessarily pieced together from tradition and the records of South Alabama Presbytery. It appears that Archibald McDuffie, grandfather of Hon. John McDuffie, Congressman from the First District of Alabama, was one of the Elders during the war period along with Thomas McCants, William Jenkins and David H. Packer. Mr. David H. Packer married Miss Mary McNeill, a school teacher. The school fund was in debt to Miss McNeill for services. As the Magnolia Academy was about to be sold for mortgage on this account Mr. Thomas McCants took up the debt. When he sold out to go to Brazil, like so many others Southerners, disheartened from the ruin of the South, he deeded the property to the Presbyterian Church. The ceremony of receiving the property was public, Rev. Paul C. Morton, noted evangelist, conducted the dedication service......

McCORD

Dr. Russell

BIRTH 5 JUNE 1833 • South Carolina, USA

DEATH 8 JANUARY 1885 • Selma, Dallas, Alabama, USA

Married:  19 Oct 1858 • Bibb County, Alabama, USA

Anne Elizabeth Ferguson

BIRTH 4 APR 1834 • Alabama, USA

DEATH 26 JUNE 1930 • Selma, Dallas, Alabama, USA

....Dr. Russell McCord was a migrant from Alabama who settled in the town of Macaé. Saldaña Mariño signed McCord’s Masonic certificates for the years 1872, 1874, 1875, and 1879. These documents comprise the best records of the U.S. Confederate Masonic–Brazilian partnership. Scottish Rite Masons will be particularly attracted to Saldaña Mariño because of his activity in the mid-1860s in the cause of separation of church and state.

.Dr. McCord’s Masonic documents are historic in another way. A second signer was the eminent José Maria da Silva Paraños, best known as the Visconde do Rio Branco. He was Grand Master of the Grande Oriente do Brasil, and he was the author of the first emancipation legislation that led, 17 years later, to abolition of slavery in his nation.


What was life like for former Southerners in Portuguese-speaking Brazil? In fact, half the Confederate North Americans quit and went home within ten years. But the rest stuck it out nobly and left a heritage that lives today, albeit as a small minority among the 170,000 citizens of Americana.

 

SOURCE:  Washington Lodge  Freemasons

 

Former Selma resident, Dr. Russell McCord his wife and three children resided North of Rio

Mrs. McCord, who died in Selma in June 1930, in her 96th year, widow of Dr. Russell McCord, a physician, was an early settler. The Doctor, his wife, and three children resided North of Rio, some distance in the country. He was employed by a wealthy plantation owner, a widow, and a close relative of the Emperor.

For most of their stay of 18 years, they lived in the family of the Countess and it cannot be said that their experiences were alike those of the other families who went down. Dr. McCord was Medical Officer for a large plantation, had a lucrative practice and good income. They returned to America only when his health failed. He passed away in 1885 is buried in Live Oak Cemetery in Dallas County, Alabama.

SOURCE:  ALABAMA PIONEERS  https://www.alabamapioneers.com/brazil-alabama-confederacy/

 

McDADE,

Dr. George Wilkins

George Wilkins McDade, M.D.

BIRTH 4 JAN 1835 • Mt. Meigs, Montgomery County, Alabama, USA

DEATH 30 AUG 1893 • Montgomery County., Alabama, USA

Married:  26 Jun 1862 • Montgomery County., Alabama, USA

Mary Elizabeth Micou

BIRTH 7 SEP 1840 • Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, USA

DEATH 25 JAN 1925 • Buffalo Junction, Mecklenburg County, Virginia, USA

She was the  daughter of 

 Dr. McDade and his family (wife Mary and two young children) left the port of New Orleans along with others on a boat chartered by the government of Brazil.  The "Marmion" left New Orleans in April of 1867 and arrived in Rio de Janiero a month later.  A hotel referred to as the government house was used solely to house the confederates upon arrival.  The family traveled with others to Linhares, on the Rio Doce in the region of Esiritu Santo.  This was referred to as Gunter's colony, after the Alabama confederate colonel that organized and headed the agricultural colony.  After several months, Dr. McDade took his family back to Rio to practice medicine.  Third child, George Henry Pedro McDade was born in Brazil. 

 

In July of 1869, as evidenced by a newspaper article in Galveston, TX, the McDade's returned to the U.S. aboard the Guerriere at the port of New York. Dr. McDade and his family (wife Mary and two young children) left the port of New Orleans along with others on a boat chartered by the government of Brazil.  The "Marmion" left New Orleans in April of 1867 and arrived in Rio de Janiero a month later.  A hotel referred to as the government house was used solely to house the confederates upon arrival.  The family traveled with others to Linhares, on the Rio Doce in the region of Esiritu Santo.  This was referred to as Gunter's colony, after the Alabama confederate colonel that organized and headed the agricultural colony.  After several months, Dr. McDade took his family back to Rio to practice medicine.  Third child, George Henry Pedro McDade was born in Brazil.  In July of 1869, as evidenced by a newspaper article in Galveston, TX, the McDade's returned to the U.S. aboard the Guerriere at the port of New York.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

McGage Homeplace  Mt. Meigs, Alabama.jpg
Page 1.jpg
Page 1.jpg
M E Micou.jpg
Mt.Meigs.jpg
G W McDade 2.jpg
Dr G W McDade.jpg
McDade Homeplace  - Mt. Meigs, Alabama 
Date and persons unknown
Mary Elizabeth Micou (Mes. George W. McDade)
The Galveston Daily News, Tue., Jul. 27 1869, Page 2

McSWAIN

M.S.

The Daily Picayune

TRIPLE SHEET

NEW ORLEANS

March 3, 1866

Transcribed from microfilm, reel 88, on at THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION, in the WILLIAMS RESERCH CENTER, at 410 CHARTRES ST. NEW ORLEANS LA 70130

 

FROM BRAZIL

 

  The Houma Civic Guard (of Terrebonne Parish) of the 3rd inat., publishes a long and interesting letter, addressed to Gen, R.I. Gibson, of that parish, By Mr. M. S. Swain, from Paranagua, Brazil, October 4, 1865. It is answer to interrogatories sent him, to which he replies verbatim.  We give a summary, as the letter is desultory:

 

  A regular line of steamers connects Paranagua and Rio de Janerio, passage $ 25.00 freights reasonable.  Mr. Swain’s plantation is on the Anemgury River, one of the tributaries of the bay of Paranagua, the town of which same is ten miles from the head of the bay.

 

  Mr. Swain was alone for four months, and was then joined by Mr. John H. Blue and Judge John Guillet and his two brothers from Charlion County, Missouri.  More than thirty five Southerners had settled there, and many more were expected from Missouri.  The principal merchant at Paranagua is Nunor Manuel Miro, a Brazilian, educated in England, whom Mr. S. speaks highly of.

 

  At Rio de Janerio, H. N. Lune & Co., W. Davis, and Thomas Baldwin, American merchants are recommended to American immigrants.  A large class ship can sail from New Orleans direct to within ten miles of the settlement.  The inhabitants are universally kind, polite and generous; the lower classes ignorant, superstitious and degraded; the better classes are mostly educated in Europe and are a superior people, but the fighting material does not come up to the Anglo-Saxon race.

 

  The better classes extended the hand of friendship to the new comers.  The laborers did not know or care where they come from, or who they were; but their well satisfied to work hard for jerked beef, black beans and bananas.  Doctors and lawyers not wanted.  Slavery exits; but free labor is preferred.  Cotton is an uncertain crop; sugar and coffee are the safest, the former paying a man of means best.  The cost of establishing a coffee farm is small, but it takes six years to make a full crop.  It pays in three years.  There is no frost to check vegetation and open the bolls of cotton, which continue to bloom, grow and ripen all the year round.  Sugar is natural to the soil and climate; grows from planting the tops; seed costs nothing; is ripe in June, July, August and September; grows larger and is much sweeter than Louisiana cane without any cultivation at all.  The cost of raising it is nothing as compared to Louisiana cane culture.  The cane is all made into molasses.  There is not a sugar boiler or a regular set of kettles in the province.  Corn is produces as in Louisiana, but not as in Illinois.  It is planted, however, at any time of the year.  Mr. Swain says that all Southern plantation agricultural implements are not of service except steam boilers and machinery attached. 

 

  The climate is healthy, uniform-a perpetual spring; no dry seasons.  No wet ones.  The rain is plentiful, and fairly distributed throughout the year.  The air is pure, water good and pure.  Land is very cheap.  Improved places can be had from $1000 to $4000.  There is great variety of lands, with plenty of table lands that resemble those on Bayon Têche, except that they incline towards the rivers instead of from them.  Near the river mouths, the lands are low and flat, subject to inundation.  From ten to fifteen miles further up the lands are high and rolling, and excellent.  On the hills the soil is a yellow loam; on the table lands a darker loam; in the bottoms still darker-all very fertile, easily worked, does not wash or bake into lumps, and is inexhaustible.  Mr. Swain saw land there that had been under cultivation two hundred years.  Comparatively little land is in cultivation, the people turning their attention almost exclusively to timber, and to the cultivation of the “matte,” the native tea.  Square lumber and planks are cut from the “canella,” the “pumbu,” the “imbioura,” the “jackaranda,” and the gierieekaepa.”  There is no cypress, or anything like it.   Near the bay od Paranagua; but forty miles from the coast, a belt of superior pine timber commences.

 

  Plantations are necessarily small, in proportion to the number of hands employed, from the fact that the plow was unheard of before Mr. Swain came to the country.  The Brazilian farmers outfit is a how and the espada, a cross between a sword and a bowie knife.  The country is not well settled up; there are people enough to do it, but they are indolent.  Otherwise, land would be worth $100 per acre, instead of only ten cents.  Near two hundred sugar plantations could be made around the Bay of Paranagua, all within twenty miles of ship anchorage.  As many more farms for coffee or sugar can be opened on the highest mountains or the lowest valleys.  The natives prefer planting on the highest hills.

 

  A man worth from $20,000 to $30,000 is considered rich.  Money is worth twelve percent per annum.  There is plenty of refined society, and the professions are well represented.  “Nature has done her part to make this country a pleasant one to live in, and we Americans are trying to do our part, and are sanguine of success.”

 

MOORE,

William T.

William Turner Moore, a veteran of the Fifteenth Texas Infantry in the Civil War and afterward a dentist in Hill County, Texas, married Victoria McMullan, Frank McMullan's sister. Both decided to go to Brazil with Frank McMullan but before leaving for Galveston to board the Derby, he accidentally shot himself in the leg while cleaning a pistol. Nevertheless, he went to Galveston. When his leg showed no improvement, he ordered it amputated, and then continued to South America. Returning to Texas in 1872, he became a lawyer in Waco. He died July 18, 1905, and was buried in Hill County, near Whitney, Texas.

Moore, Victoria McMullan. Victoria McMullan married Dr. William T. Moore, a Hill County dentist, in 1865. The two went to Brazil with her brother, Frank McMullan. In 1872, she and her husband returned to Texas. The Moores had one surviving daughter, Ora Montague Moore. Victoria died in Hill County, Texas, in 1874 from complications of childbirth.  The couple had two other children, an infant son who died at sea on the way to Brazil in 1967 and a daughter, Juanita, who also died at sea at age about five on the way back to Texas in 1872.

Ora Montague. Ora "Montie" Moore was probably born after her mother and father arrived in Brazil. Dr. and Mrs. William T. Moore went to Brazil. Family tradition says that her name, in Portuguese, meant "golden butter." She was always called "Montie," and her most intimate associates did not know her real name. "Montie" married Sep Smith, the son of Gip Smith of Smith Bend, Bosque County, Texas. Afterward, she and her husband moved to Crosbyton, Texas, where they became well known and highly respected.

SOURCE:  Griggs Thesis

N
 
 
NATHAN,
Charles
Page 1.jpg
O
 
 

P

 

 

PETTIGREW,

Rev. Robert Edward

BIRTH    13 Dec 1868,  Bells, Crockett County, Tennessee, USA

DEATH  4 Sep 1962 (aged 93),  Tippah County, Mississippi, USA

BURIAL  Ebenezer Methodist Church Cemetery,  Chalybeate,

Tippah County, Mississippi, USA

Robert was a Baptist/Protestant Minister and spent many years

as a Missionary in Brazil.

He left the United States 23 Aug 1904 and arrived in Bahia, Brazil

on  21 Sept. 1904 to  do  Missionary work.  He  arrived  in  Pernam-

buco  a  state in  northeast  Brazil  on 12 April, 1908  and  married

Brazilian  born  Bertha  Mills,  daughter of William Mitchell Mills

and Dorah Thatcher,  on 30 June 1908.   This is the place she was

she was living at the time.    They  traveled  from there in January

1909 to Maceió, Alagoas, Brazil where their first child, a daughter, 

Roberta was born 15 May 1909.

Robert, Bertha and daughter Roberta age 1 departed the Port of Bahia on the ship "Byron" May 1910.  They arrived in New York, New York on 18 Jun 1910. They made their way to Texas where son William Robert was born on 10 Oct 1910 in Denton, Denton County, Texas. They were in the US doing missionary work for a couple of years.

They left the United States again and arrived in Paranagua, Município de Paranaguá, Paraná, Brazil. Their son Woodrow Wilson was born there on 8 Jul 1913. For the next 5 years they continued with their missionary work. Their son Edward Dunn was born on 16 Nov 1915 Curitiba, Município de Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. In 1919 they left for the United States again.


New York, Passenger and Crew List
Name: Robert Edward Pettigrew
Arrival Date: 24 Jun 1919
Birth Date: 13 Dec 1868
Birth Location: Tennessee
Birth City: Bells
Port of Departure: Santos, Brazil
Port of Arrival: New York, New York
Ship Name: Uberaba
Arrived with his wife and their 4 children.

In 2 Jan 1920 Census the family lived in

Jackson Ward 3, Madison, Tennessee.
They were in the United States until 1922.

U.S. Passport Application
Name: Robert Edward Pettigrew
Age: 53
Birth Date: 13 Dec 1868
Birth Place: Bells, Tennessee
Residence Place: Jackson, Tennessee
Passport Issue Date: 8 Aug 1922
Father: W R Pettigrew
Has Photo: Yes


The missionary work continued in Brazil from 1922 to 1929 when they came back for a visit to the United States.

New Orleans, Passenger List
Name: Robert Edward Pettigrew
Arrival Date: 16 Jul 1929
Port of Arrival: United States
Birth Date: 1869
Birth Place: Tennessee, Bells
Age: 60
Port of Departure: Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Ship Name: La Plata Maru

In 5 Apr 1930 Census they lived in Bluefield, Mercer, West Virginia. Robert was 61, Bertha was 51, Roberta was 20, William Robert was 18, Woodrow Wilson was 16 and Edward was 14.

Robert, Bertha and Edward were back in Brazil later that year.

His wife Bertha died on 22 Apr 1931 in Porto Alegre Brazil at age 52. She was buried at the German Protestant/Baptist Church Cemetery in Porto Alegre, Município de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Robert and his son Edward continued their missionary work for the next 3 and a half years. It would be the last time he went to Brazil.

New Orleans, Passenger List
Name: Robert Edward Pettigrew
Arrival Date: 9 Sep 1934
Port of Arrival: United States
Birth Date: abt 1868
Birth Place: Tennessee, Bells
Age: 65
Port of Departure: Santos, Brazil
Ship Name: Rio De Janeiro Maru.
Arrived with son Edward.

On 2 Apr 1940 Humboldt, Gibson, Tennessee, Robert was a 71 year old Widower living with his sister Maggie and her husband James Taylor Sisco. Robert was retired.

PRESTRIDGE,

William Ashmund

Married Victoria H. Clay Mills, daughter of James A. Mills

and Louisa Mitchell,

Both died in Brazil

Parents : Benjamin Bagley 4 Prestridge & Mary Ann Ezell
Grand Parents : Joseph W. 3 Prestridge & Elizabeth Bagley

Died :BrazilGreat Grand Parents : John 2 Prestidge &

Elizabeth Walters
2nd Great Grand Parents : John 1 Prestidge & Ann

William A. Prestrige: Private, Co. A, 3rd Alabama Cavalry. He enlisted on September 25, 1861, at Mount Sterling, Alabama. He was present for every action of his regiment, including Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, the Atlanta Campaign, and Bentonville, and was paroled at Charlotte, North Carolina, in May 1865. He moved to Brazil and was alive in 1913, age 73.

PYLES

Ezekiel's daughter, Nancy Almina Raosr, was married to Rev. Samuel Milton Pyles. Near the end of the WBTS, they moved to Florida. During Reconstruction, they left the US and emigrated to Brazil with a group of Confederate exiles who departed in the brig Derby7 from Galveston, TX. In 1899, Nancy's son, A. Judson Pyles (1851-1911) wrote a letter and spoke at length about his family's experience in Brazil. " My parents came to Brazil in 67 from Florida where we had been living for 3 years. There were seven of us came with them, four boys and three girls. Our children all speak Portuguese and the larger ones speak English.

 

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/25418651/person/1719888075/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum

 

 From the Rasor Family Papers [more at http://www.sc.edu/library/socar/uscs/1997/rasor97.html ]: Near the end of the Civil War, [Samuel Milton] Pyles and his wife moved to Florida. During Reconstruction they left the United States and emigrated to Brazil with a group of Confederate exiles who departed in the brig ?Ci?DDerby?C/i?D from Galveston, Tx. Rarely do the postwar family papers make reference to them, but when Ezekiel died in 1876, his son Ezekiel Barmore Rasor (1833-1907) wrote them via registered mail concerning the estate settlement. Then in 1899, Ezekiel Barmore's older brother James Christian Rasor (b. 1822), made inquiries about their long-absent sister, and on 19 September he received a reply from her son A. Judson Pyles (1851-1911), in which he spoke at length about the family's experience in Brazil: My parents came to Brazil in 67 from Florida where we had been living for three years. There were seven of us came with them, four boys an[d] three girls. My second sister Julia was maried in the states. The others all maried in this country and up to a year and a half ago were all living. My father died and one sister and a brother-in-law....My mother has forty one grandchildren living and three dead. Our children all speak portugues and the larger ones speak english....All of them that are large enough to go to school study english and we speak it allmost entirely at home but the little ones take to the portugues mainly because the servants and laborers speak it and I believe it is easier to learn than english anyway. I think up to two years ago this was a better country for a poor man than the States but things are going badly wrong now, in fact the country almost bankrupt owing to bad government and various causes....The country has been spending immense sums bri[n]ging immigrants and now they are leaving by the thousand on account of the hard times, the immigrants are mostly Italians with a good many portuguese and spanish. Our laborers here are a mixture of brazillian, negroes, Spanish, portuguese & Italians with a few from northern Europe. We have a number of american boarding schools nearly all run by missionaries, mostly Methodist. The Presbyterians come next and then the Baptists.

Robert Edward Pettigrew.jpg
Pettigrew family.jpg
Page 1.jpg
Q
 
 
R
 
 
RATLIFF,
Ratcliff, . After the death of Frank McMullan, Ratcliff, whose first name has not been located, and his wife, accompanied by J. Weingarten (another McMullan colonist) and his daughter, went to Santa Barbara where a daughter was born to the couple.
SOURCE:  Griggs Thesis
ROWLAND,
Page 1.jpg
S
SATTERFIELD,
Page 1.jpg
SCHNEIDER,
Francis J. C.
 
Francis J C Schneider was born in Erfurt, Germany, on March 29, 1832 and emigrated to the United States, becoming an American citizen. He majored in letters at Jefferson College in Canonsburg, western Pennsylvania. In 1861, he completed his studies at the Western Theological Seminary in Allegheny, the same one in which Rev. Alexander Blackford had studied. He was licensed by the Ohio Presbytery and ordained in 1861 by the Saltsburg Presbytery in Pennsylvania. He was the third Presbyterian missionary to come to Brazil, having arrived in Rio de Janeiro on December 7, 1861. The Junta de New York sent him to work among German immigrants. In the same month, at the invitation of the director of Colônia D. Pedro II, maintained by Companhia União e Indústria, he preached several times to German settlers in Juiz de Fora.
Although in 1860 and 1861 Simonton and Blackford made recon-naissance visits to the then Province of São Paulo, Schneider was the first to reside in São Paulo. At the end of January 1862, he spent a few days in the capital of São Paulo and preached in German to about thirty people. He then proceeded to the interior, visiting the German and Swiss colonies of São Jerônimo, Ibicaba, Beri, Cuba-tingo, São Lourenço and Paraíso, preaching in them and also in Campinas, Limeira and Rio Claro, always in German. These colonies were on the land of distinguished citizens such as Senator Vergueiro, Senator Queiroz and Commander Luís Antônio de Souza Barros. On this trip, Schneider settled in Rio Claro, staying there until March 1863 and preaching on Sundays in the aforementioned colonies. Soon, however, he was disappointed with the Germans' spirituality.
Schneider.jpg
SHACKELFORD,
John 
Page 1.jpg
Page 1.jpg

SMITH,

Rev. John Rockwell

(Married Susan Caroline "Carrie" Porter, daughter of

James Denford Porter, See above) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to historian Vicente Temudo Lessa, Smith was the “Simonton of the North”. He surrounded himself with a select group of canvasser evangelists who did important preparatory work for missionaries like himself, DeLacey Wardlaw, George W. Butler, Joseph H. Gauss and William M. Thompson. In October 1875, he created the periodical Salvação de Graça, which was short-lived, with only twelve issues published. It was printed in Lisbon, because no printing house in Recife wanted to take the service. In this effort, he had the important collaboration of Rev. William LeConte, who, after a brief stay in Brazil, died in the United States in late 1876.

Rev. Smith organized the Recife Presbyterian Church on August 11, 1878, accompanied by Rev. Alexander L. Blackford, who was then traveling in the service of the American Bible Society . Among the twelve founding members, there were three young men who later embraced the ministry: João Batista de Lima, José Francisco Primênio da Silva and Belmiro de Araújo César. These young people were part of a small class for the study of the Brief Catechism. Desiring to prepare them for the ministry, Smith hired them as canvassers or part-time evangelists, which provided them with practical experience and financial support during their studies. In addition to Recife, Smith was a pioneer in many other places. In the following years, he also organized the Churches of Goiana (21-11-1880), Paraíba, currently João Pessoa (12/21/1884), Pão de Açúcar (8/18/1887) and Maceió (9/11/1887), always under strong opposition from opponents.

In 1879, the famous case of the “neophyte” occurred in Pernambuco. In a newspaper in Recife, a series of slanderous articles against Protestantism began to appear. The following year, these articles were brought together in a booklet entitled “Respectful questions addressed to mr. minister of the evangelical church in this province by a neophyte from the same church. ” The alleged neophyte was in fact Capuchin Friar Celestino de Pedávoli, who was promoting an intense campaign against evangelicals. Through the booklet “The Neophyte Denied”, Rev. Smith gave a concise and thorough answer to the alleged member of his flock.

For several years, Smith had to work almost alone, because the few colleagues who came to help him were transferred (Boyle couple) or died (LeConte, Ballard F. Thompson). The arrival of the Wardlaw couple, in 1880, allowed him to have much needed rest, going in 1881 to visit work in southern Brazil. While there , he met Susan Carolina Porter (1857-1921), with whom he married. Susan was the daughter of a couple from Alabama who came to Brazil shortly after the American Civil War.

As soon as they arrived in Rio de Janeiro, their father, James D. Porter, died of yellow fever. The widow, Susan Meggs Porter (1825-1890), then moved to Campinas, where she opened a American and British pension. Later, Dona Susan Porter and daughter Ella Virginia Porter went to the capital, having been listed in the Church of São Paulo on March 4, 1887. Young Ella came to marry the Methodist missionary Rev. Edmund A. Tilly (1860-1917). Another son of this family, William Calvin Porter, would also be a valiant Presbyterian worker in Northeastern Brazil.

With the transfer of the Wardlaw couple to Fortaleza in October 1882, Smith was again alone, but the arrival of Dr. George Butler in February 1883 allowed the Smith couple in November of that year to have their “furlough” (vacations and disclosure of the in the United States. It was Smith's first vacation in eleven years. Mrs. Wardlaw and her children went with them. When the Smiths returned to Brazil in September 1884, they brought with them Rev. Joseph Henry Gauss and his wife. In the same year, another worker arrived to assist in the work of Recife: William C. Porter, Smith's brother-in-law. On November 11, 1884, the first Society of Women of the Presbyterian Church of Brazil was created in the Church of Recife .

Rev. Smith had a vast theological culture, nurtured by his rich library. His long sermons, at least fifty minutes long, were deeply doctrinal and firmly Calvinistic. His career as a trainer for future ministers began in the Northeast. He taught all subjects, including Greek. On May 22, 1887, assisted by Revs. Blackford and Wardlaw, ordered his first class of three students, the aforementioned João Batista de Lima, José Primênio and Belmiro César. Revs were also his students in the northeast. William C. Porter, Juventino Marinho da Silva and Manoel Alfredo Guimarães. On August 17, 1888, the missionaries Smith, Wardlaw and Butler, as well as the newly ordained pastors Lima, Primênio and Belmiro and the elder William C. Porter organized the Presbytery of Pernambuco.

When organizing the Synod of the Presbyterian Church in Brazil in September 1888, Smith was the rapporteur for the commission that recommended the creation of the Presbyterian Seminary. Professors were elected Rev. Smith and Rev. Blackford, who died in 1890. In 1891, the Central University of Kentucky awarded Smith the title of Doctor of Divinity (DD). At the end of 1892, Smith moved to Nova Friburgo, in the State of Rio, where the seminar opened on November 15. The other teachers were Rev. John M. Kyle, pastor of the local Presbyterian church, and Rev. João Gaspar Meyer, Lutheran pastor . There were only four students: Franklin do Nascimento, Manoel Alfredo Guimarães, Alberto Meyer and the future historian Vicente Temudo Lessa. In addition to theology, Rev. Smith taught English, history, geography, arithmetic and rudiments of Greek and Hebrew.

In early 1895, Rev. Smith, his family and students moved to São Paulo, where the seminary was transferred, joining the Theological Institute created two years earlier by Rev. Eduardo Carlos Pereira. In addition to teaching, Rev. Smith collaborated with the 1st Presbyterian Church, where he preached frequently. At the Synod of 1897, he presented the controversial “Moção Smith”, requesting that the American mother churches help the Brazilian church in the work of evangelization by direct methods, applying their resources in the preparation of ministers and in the support of schools for their children. of believers, not in large schools. Since 1878 Smith had acquired the conviction that missionaries were not to be involved in secular schools. In 1906, this position would influence the division of Mission South into Mission East, with headquarters in Lavras (favorable to schools), and Mission Oeste, based in Campinas (contrary to them).

With the crisis that resulted in the division of the church (1903), the Smith family started to attend the United Presbyterian Church of São Paulo. From 1903 to 1905, Dona Carolina was president of the Sociedade Auxiliadora de Senhoras (SAS), which participated in the campaign for the purchase of the land on Rua Helvetia and the construction of the temple (changed to SAF in 1936).

In early 1907 the seminary moved to Campinas, where Rev. Smith ended his long career as a pastor and educator. In addition to leading the seminary, he held the positions of Greek, systematic theology, practical theology and ecclesiastical government. In 1910, he went to the United States for health care. On his return, he continued to serve the church; Besides working in the seminary, he regularly preached in two places close to the city. From 1904 to 1914, he participated in the interdenominational commission that, under the direction of Dr. Hugh Clarence Tucker (1857-1956), executive secretary of the American Bible Society, prepared a new translation of the Bible, the “Brazilian Translation”, published in 1917.

Smith prepared more than fifty men for the ministry. Among his last students were Jorge Goulart, Galdino Moreira, Guilherme Kerr and José Carlos Nogueira. When one of them noted that he needed to rest, Rev. Smith replied, "I will have eternity to rest." Due to health problems, he retired in December 1917. A few days before he died, on April 9, 1918, he said upon waking up that he had dreamed of distributing leaflets in the interior of Brazil. His wife, Dona Carolina, died on November 17, 1921. The couple's tomb at the Cemitério da Saudade, in Campinas, has the words: “They fought the good fight, kept their faith. Who will separate us from the love of Christ? ”

                                                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://agrestepresbiteriano.com.br/a-vida-do-rev-john-rockwell-smith/#

 

 

STEELE,

Joseph Beal

Joseph Beal Steere (1842-1940) was sent by the University of Michigan in a trip around the world, from 1870 (September) to 1875, to collect materials in all departments of natural and human sciences for the University’s Museum. He went from New York to Brazil (São Luís, Maranhão), proceeding up the Amazon, and spent about eighteen months on that river and some of its tributaries. Arrived at the head of navigation of the Amazon, at the mouth of the Río Santiago (Peru), he floated back two hundred miles on a raft, to reach the mouth of the Huallaga. He ascended this river to Yurimaguas, going thence across the Andes. He made part of the journey on foot and horseback; on the way he spent some time in the old cities of Moyobamba, Chachapoyas and Cajamarca. He struck the sea-coast at a town called Huanchaco, near the city of Trujillo; thence he went to Lima; and from there to Guayaquil; and thence, overland, to Quito, continually adding to his store of specimens. While at Quito, he ascended the volcano Pichincha and went to the bottom of the crater. He returned from Quito to Lima and made an excursion along the coast of Peru, collecting old Peruvian pottery from graves, etc. From Lima he went to Cerro de Pasco mining regions, making collections of minerals. Returning to Lima, he crossed the Pacific in a ship bound for Macao, China.

Jokn Rockwell Smith, a worker in the Southern United States Presbyterian Church, was born in Lexington, Kentucky, on December 29, 1846. He studied at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. After graduating in theology at Union Seminary (1868-1871) in Hampden-Sydney, Virginia, he was licensed by the West Lexington Presbytery in June 1871 and ordained on December 18, 1872. He worked as a graduate in Winchester , in his state, from October 1871 until April 1872. Since 1871, he was accepted, alongside the couple John and Agnes Boyle, as a volunteer for the new missionary work to be started in northern Brazil. The opening of this work was made possible by contributions from the New Orleans (Louisiana) and Mobile (Alabama) Presbyterian Churches .
On January 15, 1873 Smith arrived in Pernambuco, where he did a remarkable pioneer work as a missionary and educator. He started the services on August 10 of the same year, with an audience of ten adults and some children. As he still did not speak the language well, he had to read his sermon on Luke 4: 16-22. On the 30th, he recorded in a small pocket diary: “It's a fragile start”. At that time, the only other evangelical work in Recife was that of the congregationals, directed by Manoel José da Silva Viana, a deacon at the church of Rev. Robert R. Kalley in Rio de Janeiro and a canvasser of the British and Foreign Bible Society.
J R Smith.jpg
The Smiths had four sons and two daughters. Of the children, three followed  the ministerial career (James Porter, Robert Benjamin and William Kyle) and   the other was a doctor (Rockwell Emerson). His daughter Sarah Warfield Smith married the missionary Rev. Gaston Boyle (1882-1965). The firstborn, James Porter Smith, born in Recife on August 19, 1882, after studying at Union Semi-nary in Richmond, returned to Brazil in 1909. In the same year, he married Sadie Miller Hall, from Vila Americana, and in 1910 was ordained in Sorocaba. He pastored several churches in the Presbytery of São Paulo and taught at the Campinas Seminary from 1918 to 1930, succeeding his parent. He wrote the book An Open Door in Brazil (1925), an account of the missionary work of the South-ern Church in Brazilian lands. Returning to the United States, he became professor of theology at Union Seminary. He was the last missionary from the Western Mission to leave the Campinas region. He died in Richmond on July 31, 1940.
Her brother, Robert Benjamin Smith, born in Friburgo on August 24, 1893, studied for ministry in the United States and came to Pernambuco in 1923. He was a pastor in Areias and a professor at the Recife Seminary. He returned to the United States in 1929. At least six grandchildren of Rev. John R. Smith were also pastors. Rev. Dr. Morton H. Smith, his great-nephew, 78, is a professor of biblical and systematic theology at the Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Greenville, South Carolina. He was the first executive secretary of the Presby-terian Church of America - PCA (1973-1988) and in 2000 he was elected moderator of the General Assembly of that church. He is the author of many books and essays, and has occasionally visited Brazil.
j r smith 2.jpg
Joseph Beal Stelle.jpg
Joseph B. Steere (bottom row center) and his students prior to their 1887 Philippine expedition
Joseph B Steele 2.jpg
T
 
 
THOMAS
Robert Porter

 

(1825 - 1897)

Robert Porter Thomas was born August 2, 1825, in Dallas County., Alabama, USA. It was the 89 of the 11 or 12 children of John and Ferebe Thomas. He was the grandson of Capt. Robert Black Thomas, a patriot of the American Revolution, and Martha Thomas; great-grandson of John Thomas, also a patriot of the American Revolution, and Jane Thomas. This John was born in Cardiff, Wales. He came single, apparently, to Pennsylvania. He  married in Chester, Pennsylvania Miss Jane Black in 1743.

 

At the time of the American Revolution, the family was in South Carolina near Spartanburg, going later to the small town of Greer, very close to Greenville and where Furman University is located. Robert,  died on March 2, 1781, during the Battle of Mud Lick, in that same state. He left the widow with 3 daughters and 1 son, John, who was still a child..  John Thomas Sr., Colonel of the Spartan Regiment, was taken to prison in Ninety-Six, where he stayed a few months. Then he saw his son Abraham die. He was then transferred to Charleston, South Carolina.  He completed 18 months of imprisonment, after which he was released. There is a copy of the 1783 application, asking the government for compensation for the damage suffered during the war. (Documents in the Archive of the Est. South Carolina - USA).

 

Robert visited the wooden house in Greer, where Colonel John Thomas and his wife lived their last days. The house is still standing! He died in 1811. He was buried on his property. It has that the head-stonee is one that is in a cattle field, on the other side of a small road that was opened in the middle of that property, many years later. The stone is badly damaged by time and if there was any engraving on the stone, the erosion was in charge of erasing it. t Jane, who died just before her husband, was also buried there. John and Jane's family were pious Presbyterians. He realizes whether, from the letters found in the 1830s to 1850s, that Ferebe, Robert Porter Thomas's little girl, was a zealous crest and at the end of his days, already at Mine Creek, today Nashville, Arkansas, must have belonged to the First local Baptist Church.

 

In about 1819, John and Ferebe, parents of Robert Porter Thomas, moved from South Carolina to Alabama, where Robert was born. In 1837, the entire family moved to Lowndes County, Mississippi. In 1839, John, the father of Robert died. Ferebe assumed full responsibility for the management of the farm, having under her care almost thirty slaves in the fields.

 

 It is believed that Robert, when reaching 21 years of age, decided to follow his brother Samuel S., who had moved to Mine Creek, Arkansas. Around 1835, this place was virgin forest, only cut by some trails of Indians and hunters. Coming from Marengo County, Alabama, Rev. Isaac Cooper Perkins, arrived there with his family, taking with him  three other families. They cleared the forest, built their log cabins and this nucleus gave rise to the city that today is called Nashville, Arkansas. Elder Perkins immediately prepared the Meeting House with two floors. Besides that, he fixed the area destined to be the cemetery. All in the part of his land that he had managed to buy from the government.

 

"... Mine Creek Baptist Church was organized in 1835, by Rev. I. C. Perkins. The name of the Church was later changed from that of Nashville's First Baptist Church. The record says, with respect to Rev. Perkins a venerable man of, traveling on horseback, gave his all, almost full time, without receiving payments, to preach and organize churches in this region. His work extended over the territory between Little Rock, Arkansas, and Jefferson, Texas. It is also known that Rev. Perkins gave the land on which the first house of worship was erected. The Rev. I. C. Perkins was, in 1848, the 19th president of theArkansas Baptist Convention.

 

A mention of this gentleman is because one of his daughters, Emily, married Robert Porter Thomas, on December 6, 1849. Both Perkins and Robert were Masons, founders with others, at Pleasant Lodge No. 30, in November, 1849. Robert is mentioned as "Guardian Junior" and was among the  first board members. His original letter, as a mason, is well kept in the hands of one of his great-granddaughters. At the end of 1850, Hannah (Guest) Perkins, wife of I.C. Perkins, passed away. "The Tennessee Baptist" reported onFebruary 14, 1885.

**


In a short space of time, Robert and wife Emily suffered joys and sorrows, with births and deaths in the family. During that time, Ferebe Thomas Robert’s mother, came from Mississippi to move with him. In 1851. Robert and Emily's first child was born on June 5, 1851 - Martha Ferebe  Thomas, known as ''Mattie".


In October 1852, the Arkansas State Baptist Convention was held in Nashville. Robert's name appears more than once in the Ata, including as the rapporteur of an education commission. On March 5, 1855, William Francis Thomas was born, the 1st son of the couple and the following September 26, came the death of Ferebe Thomas, the mother of Robert.

 

With a part of the inheritance that Robert received from his parents and his brother, he acquired a sizable piece of property of 1,200 acres there in Arkansas, of which he only cultivated 100 acres. On November 5, 1857, Abram Curtis Thomas was born , "Abe", and on August 6,.1861, Margareth Elisabeth, "Lizzie followed The Civil War began in April 1861. In 1862, Robert was seen in the ranks of the Confederate Army, as 1st sergeant, in the 229 Battalion of Infantry, Arkansas. He took part in two battles, in that same State. On May 11, 1864, Robert S. was born ... the 4th son of the couple. On April 9, 1865, the War ended with the defeat of the Confederates. On February 16.1867, Sarah Emily "Sallie" was born, and on March 26.1868, Martha Ferebe, almost 17 years old, married William Sims. On August 31, 1870, Mary Frances was born the last child of Robert and Emily. Altogether there were now 7 children.

 

Some time after the end of the war, Robert got it together and built a nice house on the property house on your property, of which they would never really enjoy. Something happened that undermined the idea of ​​Robert'. He could not stay there. At the end of July 1870, the tax evaluation was conducted. This revealed that his property, which in 1860, had been valued at $ 12,000, was now worth only 4,000. Perhaps this result, added to other reasons, gave reasons why Robert wished to emigrate.

 

But, at that time of events, the enthusiasm for emigrating, as it was already a little cool, in the Southern States. 1666 and 1868 had been the busiest. In 1870, Robert’s decision was made. On September 18, 1870, Robert, his wife and probably his 15-year-old son William F., requested that the Liberty Grove Baptist Church, Sevier County, Arkansas, grant them dissmission letters to join another church of the same faith and order.

 

**

The year 1871 came with a sad occurrence: on January 28, the son Robert S., 7 years old, died. On February 21, 1871 Robert was consecrated to the Ministry of the Word. There are records of the minutes of its consecration, in a Marriage Registration Book, at the De Queen City Forum in Arkansas.

 

It is almost certain that this consecration was born out of the experience with the Reverend I. C. Perkins, at Causa's tavern, in Mine Creek, and that his wish  was to be useful in the country where he would go, Brazil.

 

I. C. Perkins would baptize Antonio Tixira de Albuquerque, who would became the first Brazilian Baptist. This important act for the History of Baptists in Brazil as he participated with his colleague E.H. Quillin, then pastor of the two churches in Santa Barbara.

 

**


On May 4, 1871, in Arkansas, a document signed by fifteen people from the community, recommending Robert P. Thomas "to the good citizens of Brazil. On May 28, 1871, Robert'is saddened by the news of the death of his brother Abram D. Thomas. At the end of June, the his family left their native land: the couple and their children, William Francis, Abram Curtis, Margareth Elisabeth, Sarah Emily and Mary Frances -only 11 months old. Martha Ferebe, the firstborn, was married, and stayed in Arkansas and never came to Brazil. Subsequently, she moved to Navarro Co., Texas.

 

Along with Robert Thomas and family came, from the same place, Mr. David  R. Coulter and his son Dr. George DeKalb Coulter. They were Baptists. Dr. George was also a Mason. They arrived in Rio de Janeiro, on July 22, 1871, by the steamship "North America" · coming from New York. Four days later they went to Santa Barbara, SP, via Santos. These two families came on their own account, independent of any group or immigration agent.

 

Abram Curtis, 13 years old, did not want to leave his toys in his homeland. Marbles. At the time, they were real marble.  Abram filled the pockets of his boyish clothes and brought as many as they fit. In a "box of memory; as ".  Some descendants who reside in Monte Mor, SP still have some.

**


Robert  Porter Thomas is among those who founded the Masonis Order. “George Washington ", in Santa Barbara, in 1874.

 

On May 2, 1876, Robert 'acquired a property near Cantpo. The property consisted of land, home, galpae and other improvements. It was primarily owned by Brazilians, and according to the report, it was known as the Sitio dos Godoys. On October 27, 1866, it had been acquired by Major Robert Meriwether and his wife Mary C. Underwood Meriwether. On March 22, 1867, they sold a portion of the land to Edwin Gehazi  Britt, but without specifying the limits. On August 28, 1875, Robert Meriwether was already moving into a next move. He had acquired a place in Botucatu, and was already interested in disposing of the property within Santa Barbara, SP, He sold half of it to Robert Thomas, on May 2, 1876.

 

A payment plan was set up for 4 years, in installments.  But on May 7, 1879, Robert handed over the property to William Patton McFadden and his son Robert W. McFadden, with the presence of Robert Underwood Meriwether, then his father's attorney, Robert Meriwether, who was living in Batucatu. There is no indication about the reason that led Robert to give up the property. But, there is an ibdication that his health was not enough to bear the responsibility of agricultural work in the proportions Robert had imagined, even though he was a man born, raised and trained in the hardships of the countryside of agriculture. It may also be that there was a problem with respect to property currencies.

 

On June 27, 1988, the matter was resolved according to the public Deed - friendly division. On the occasion, Major Robert Meriwether and his wife, who came from Botucatu, especially, to sign the document at the Registry were present.  At the age of 54, Robert Porter Thomas's handwriting was shaky. This may reveal a health problem.

 

The participation of Robert in the work of the Baptist Mission in Santa Barbara, shows he was a tireless collaborator, also going to help the Church.

 

On October 11 .1877, William Francis Thomas married Frances Elisa Ferguson. On November 18.1877, Margaret Elisabeth Thomas married Robert William Daniel. Rev. Richard Ratcliff officiated both marriages and from them there are Certificates, obtained in the Municipal Archive of SBSP, of the Book of Marriages of Acatolicos.

On February 15 ,1880, Robert and Emily Thomas lost Mary Frances,  who was less than 10 years old. She was buried in the Cemiterio do Campo in the same grave her parents were buried years later.

 

On March 5, 1988, Abram Curtis Thomas married May Aline Kennerly.

 

On 1February 15, 1890, Sarah Emily Thomas married William Stowe Ferguson. This was Fanny Elisa's brother, married to William Francis Thomas - this is the brother of Sarah Emily. This was a more or less common event in commonality, when brothers sought to marry sisters from another family.

**

Before Sarah Emily's wedding, her father had to write her a letter from her spiritual life. Of that letter, we can see that he was concerned about the possibility of his daughter going down paths that would lead her out of the Gospel. He mentioned several Bible verses for her to read.

 

On March 18, 1895, Robert would write another letter, but then to his granddaughter Martha Ethel, daughter of William F. and Fanny E. Thomas. This letter was translated and published in 0 Jornal Batista, November 27 1966, p. 6. The young woman left the house and went to take refuge in her grandmother's, because she thought her mother had punished her very severely.

**

Robert P. Thomas's hair had turned white. His beard gave him that air of a patriarch, of serene countenance, of marked look.  he always tried to resolve matters with a dose of born humor. He was wanted and loved by his children, grandchildren,

One hand in the other: In 1890, he signed a Declaration, in the 11th special edition of Camara Ml, the principal of Santa Barabar, according to the current law that he wished to continue as an American citizen. He still had the hope of returning to Arkansas, where he left the house he built and the land he worked for!

**

On May 5, 1897, Robert was called the presence of God. On this date is a letter written by his son Willi Francis Thomas to his sister Martha F. Sims, in the USA. It expresses the his tenderness for his father. When he died, Robert had completed 47 and a half years of married life 'with his dear Emily. The widow stayed for a while with her son William Francis. Then she moved in with her daughter Margareth Elisabeth Daniel, in TatuI. There she died on April 19, 1904. Years later, her remains were transferred to the Cemiterio do Campo, in Santa Barbara and are in the same tomb as Robert P. Thomas.

**

 

Robert was a skilled craftsman and, given his needs, he knew how to make furniture for the use of his home. There is an old portrait that was published in a newspaper with the following caption: "Robert Porter Thomaz and wife Emily Perkins and daughter Sarah Emilia Ferguson. Porter Thomaz owned the first carpentry shop in Santa Barbara; 1872.  Among the objects of the Museu do Campo in Santa Barbara is a planer that is from Robert. So, too, are work pants, made of thick cotton fabric. It is clear by it’s appearance of having been used a lot. His measurements suggest that Robert was a man about 1.70 or 1.72 meters tall, almost skinny.  A cousin, Charlotte Ferguson Costarelli keeps a quilt- made by Emily before coming to Brazil.

**

.

William Francis Thomas and Abram Curtis Thomas became members and deacons of the Baptist church in Santa Barbara. William felt called to the Ministerio da Pala bra, but, unattended, he had no way to continue his efforts. Anne Hope Thomas, one of the daughters of William F. Thomas, was the first young, born in Brazil, to be a missionary of FMB-SBC. In 1908.

 

When the Uniao Feminina Missionaria, in Brazil, was organized, Anne was the single female belonging to the group of members and directors. Her name appears as Anne T. Parker, however, she would only have that last name in 1915, when she married. Still single, she went to Texas. She studied some subjects in the sector '' fe minine of the Seminar in Fort Worth. There she met John Bruton Parker. They got married and came to Brazil, with their little firstborn - Addie Hope.

 

They worked in Pernambuco and in Laranhao. There Lois was born, the second of the couple's daughters. Anne was very fond of music and, in this way, she helped a lot of work in the churches where she went, especially with women and children. The hymn 541, by Cantor Cristao, Pequenos Raios, and a collaboration by Anne. In addition, she prepared two others that were published in "Hymnos Especiais para Coros", a compilation by Leopoldo Alves Feitosa, published in 1926, Rio de Janeiro.

 

Before the departure of holidays to the USA, on August 08, 1922, Anne and her husband were in Minas Gerais to check on the possibility of their transfer to the USA. After they returned from the holidays, they departed.

 

On the eve of departure, brother-in-law Ricardo Pitrowsky took a portrait of the three sisters, Anne, Kate and Eugenia, with their respective husbands and daughters.. The image of the ship "Cuiaba" that was leaving the port was engraved on our retina and the white handkerchiefs accepted a final farewell. Eugenia had made Anne a new dress as a present. Later she would write: "I separated the dress that you made for me, in order to disembark with him in New York. I have my new shoes, but I carry my old white shoes in my luggage to wear them If so required ." It looks like she had bunions, just like yours go

Kate!

On August 19, 1922, Anne wrote on board the "Cuiaba". They were sailing around the mouth of the Amazon River:

 

_ "We are having a good trip. We will arrive tonight, in Par, where we will spend Sunday. Monday we will leave. Last night we hardly slept because of the heat. 'Papa' had to take Lois and go for a walk with her in poop until the temperature improves. (•••) In Pernambuco, the Taylors took us aboard to go to breakfast with them. I saw students and other missionary friends there at the Colegio. '. what Ricardo telegraphs to Manoel Caldeira's father as soon as he is operated on. We would like, in some way, to do the maximum for them, who have always been so good with us. , our canvasser in Maranhao. Today, the 21st, we are still Do Para and how hot it is! Stay oars here for another day. The place is beautiful, but hot. You were so kind going on board for the farewell! I watched them when the ship left, until I lost sight of them, In order not to cry, I kept busy, packing things up. But, how I miss you! "

 


They arrived in Dallas, Texas. On March 25, 1923, she wrote a rigid letter to her sisters Kate and Eugenia:

 

 

"I hope you received the letter talking about my going to the hospital in order to be operated on, Everything was like dying and returning to live, I was in the hospital for almost a month and I have been at home for about two weeks. Little by little I am getting more tired. Two stones were extracted from the vesicle. I have an excellent doctor. God was very good to us, through these people here. Some neighbors have come to help me with the housework. I hope to be strong enough to return to Brazil, in September to come. "

 

connisa of the First Baptist Church in the capital, Washington, D.C. Just as we close this book, she and family are moving to Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. His sister resides in Arlington, Virginia. Mrs. C. A. Slater. -

 

 William F. Thomas to his sister Martha Ferebe Sims. Sent it from Santa Barbara SP, dated 05/30/1989, to Hubbard City, Hill Co., Texas.

 

He speaks of the prolonged summer, which had not occurred in a long time. The plants are lost. There was a lot of financial difficulty and a lack of employment. It tells about the best way to harvest coffee and treat it, types of coffee, selection and drying process.

It records about the visit that Dr. Bagby had made to the Church, in March of that year, when there were good meetings. William asks his sister to say to "Fully" that she missed him a lot and that if she happened to be able to eg against him, she would give him a "Brazilian hug". "Fully" was the nickname of Eugene Fulton Smith, son of Alfred Iverson Smith and Sarah Jane (Bryce) Smith, Methodists. At that time, "Fully" was in the USA to study at some seminar and went to visit Martha F. Sims. Almost at the end of his letter, the author says:

 

"I think I will send Martha to school in Nova Friburgo. Brother Bagby wants her to stay with the family to be with his daughter Ermine, who is a few months younger than Martha.


My son Arthur Alonzo made his profession of faith and was baptized, carried out by Brother Bagby. With this, there are already three sons, used by him. This makes me very happy. He should be back in June. A few days ago I wrote to you about this. It was his custom to write to Daddy when he had to come, but now this will be done with me. I will do the best I can. "

 SOURCE:  Loosely translated and paraphrased from the original Portuguese manuscript.

CENTELHA   EM  RE STOLHO  SECO

Uma  Contribuiao  para  a  Hist6ria dos Prim6rdios do Trabalho Batista no Brasil

Betty  Antunes  de Oliveira

McGage Homeplace  Mt. Meigs, Alabama.jpg

M

MASTEN,

One of the McMullen colony bachelors, a Mr. Masten, determined to remain in Rio de Janeiro. At the immigrant hotel he had met and fallen in love with Anna Miller, who, with her parents Irving and Sophie Miller, was set to go to Colonel Gunter's colony on the radio Doc. Masten proposed to Anna, and she excepted, despite the fact that she had been seeing another young man for quite some time and was generally assume to be spoken for. Regardless, the family set a date for the nesting miller wedding and made all of the preparations. When the day and hour arrived, however, Masten was nowhere to be found. Guests and family at the event felt mortified, and the bride would hurt and dejected. When a friend went to locate the missing groom, he found that Madison had been murdered. Anna's first love or later admitted the crime with the statement that if he could not Mary Miss Anna, she should not have another man.

SOURCE  The Lost Eden,  Page 87

 

 

McCANN

William T.

William T. McCann was a close friend of the Mcknight family.  He elected to stay in Rio after the group's arrival in Brazil with his fiends, whose daughter, Emma McKnight was seriously ill.

SOURCE:  The Elusive Eden,  Page 87

McCANTS.

Thomas

Return to Alabama – Dissatisfied Emigrants to Brazil

August 10, 1867

There arrived at the Central Hotel last night a party of ladies and gentlemen who left Brazil last month, thoroughly, totally, heartily disgusted with their new homes among the hybrid masses in the overrated, well-flattered country of Brazil.  The party is composed entirely of Alabamians, among whom are MESSRS. JOHM M. HARRIS, W. J. DeBERRY, G. E. JONES, THOMAS McCANTS, T. A. McELROY, JOHN STANFIELD, D. W. BRAZIELL, and eighteen other gentlemen and their wives and children. They give affecting and pitiful accounts of the sufferings of many hundreds of deluded Southerners who were lured away from their friends by the tempting offers of the Brazilian Government, and the tales of wild and impulsive American adventurers.

 

They represent that there is no regularly organized Government in Brazil–there is no society–but little cultivation among the inhabitants–no laudable ambition–no ways of making money–the people scarcely know the meaning of the word “kindness”– the American citizens live about in huts, uncared for–there is general dissatisfaction among the emigrants, and the whole Brazil representation is a humbug and a farce. The American Consul is in receipt of numerous and constant applications from helpless American citizens to assist them in getting back to their true, rightful country. CAPT. JACK PHELAN, who is so well known and admired in Montgomery, has, we learn, left with a large number of other young men, to make California their home.  The advice of the gentlemen with whom we conversed is to dissipate the idea that Alabama is not still a great country – to cause dreaming over the unhappy past–say nothing that will assist to keep up political troubles, stay at home, but work, work, work, and Alabama will yet be, what she ought to be, and can be, a great and glorious country.

The long-deferred abolition of slavery in Brazil is to be hastened. A recent law releases all slaves after two years, and they are to receive wages during this period.  Brazil is the last country laying claim to civilization that still maintains slavery.  It is not sixty years since slavery was abolished in the British colonies, and less than half that time since this country rid itself of the evil.

SOURCES

New York Times, Aug. 15, 1867

Reprinted in the The South Alabamian, Jackson, Alabama, October 1, 1887

From :  robertstapleton@tripod.com

The McCants Letters

(Excerpted)

....John McCants and his brother, Thomas, came from South Carolina from the Darlington District about the year 1800 and settled in the lower edge of Wilcox County on the land now occupied by Mr. Daniel J. McCarty, a ruling elder in this church. At this time John McCants had a son, Thomas, who was about four years of age, destined late to be a Ruling Elder in the Presbyterian church for year. Near their home in or before the year 1816 a hewn log house was built for a church,in which they worshiped until about the year 1819. Probably in the year 1819 a discussion arose as to the ownership of the ground on which the log church was erected, originally settled by Thomas McCants, Sr., which was not legally entered by him. A neighbor, Peter McArthur, procured government titles to the property and thus brought on a dispute. Tradition states that the church session met to determine the true ownership of the land where upon Peter McArthur secured his claim. This judgment so angered Thomas McCants that he withdrew from the Presbyterian Church and united with the Methodist Church......

.....There were eighteen members in the reorganized body, with Dr. William Jenkins, Mr. Thomas McCants and Mr. David H Packer as Ruling Elders.....

.....As the old church records up to 1888 were burned, probably in the old Hunt Hotel in Brewton, Alabama, these items of history are necessarily pieced together from tradition and the records of South Alabama Presbytery. It appears that Archibald McDuffie, grandfather of Hon. John McDuffie, Congressman from the First District of Alabama, was one of the Elders during the war period along with Thomas McCants, William Jenkins and David H. Packer. Mr. David H. Packer married Miss Mary McNeill, a school teacher. The school fund was in debt to Miss McNeill for services. As the Magnolia Academy was about to be sold for mortgage on this account Mr. Thomas McCants took up the debt. When he sold out to go to Brazil, like so many others Southerners, disheartened from the ruin of the South, he deeded the property to the Presbyterian Church. The ceremony of receiving the property was public, Rev. Paul C. Morton, noted evangelist, conducted the dedication service......

McCORD

Dr. Russell

BIRTH 5 JUNE 1833 • South Carolina, USA

DEATH 8 JANUARY 1885 • Selma, Dallas, Alabama, USA

Married:  19 Oct 1858 • Bibb County, Alabama, USA

Anne Elizabeth Ferguson

BIRTH 4 APR 1834 • Alabama, USA

DEATH 26 JUNE 1930 • Selma, Dallas, Alabama, USA

....Dr. Russell McCord was a migrant from Alabama who settled in the town of Macaé. Saldaña Mariño signed McCord’s Masonic certificates for the years 1872, 1874, 1875, and 1879. These documents comprise the best records of the U.S. Confederate Masonic–Brazilian partnership. Scottish Rite Masons will be particularly attracted to Saldaña Mariño because of his activity in the mid-1860s in the cause of separation of church and state.

.Dr. McCord’s Masonic documents are historic in another way. A second signer was the eminent José Maria da Silva Paraños, best known as the Visconde do Rio Branco. He was Grand Master of the Grande Oriente do Brasil, and he was the author of the first emancipation legislation that led, 17 years later, to abolition of slavery in his nation.


What was life like for former Southerners in Portuguese-speaking Brazil? In fact, half the Confederate North Americans quit and went home within ten years. But the rest stuck it out nobly and left a heritage that lives today, albeit as a small minority among the 170,000 citizens of Americana.

 

SOURCE:  Washington Lodge  Freemasons

 

Former Selma resident, Dr. Russell McCord his wife and three children resided North of Rio

Mrs. McCord, who died in Selma in June 1930, in her 96th year, widow of Dr. Russell McCord, a physician, was an early settler. The Doctor, his wife, and three children resided North of Rio, some distance in the country. He was employed by a wealthy plantation owner, a widow, and a close relative of the Emperor.

For most of their stay of 18 years, they lived in the family of the Countess and it cannot be said that their experiences were alike those of the other families who went down. Dr. McCord was Medical Officer for a large plantation, had a lucrative practice and good income. They returned to America only when his health failed. He passed away in 1885 is buried in Live Oak Cemetery in Dallas County, Alabama.

SOURCE:  ALABAMA PIONEERS  https://www.alabamapioneers.com/brazil-alabama-confederacy/

 

 

McELROY

T. E.

Return to Alabama – Dissatisfied Emigrants to Brazil

August 10, 1867

There arrived at the Central Hotel last night a party of ladies and gentlemen who left Brazil last month, thoroughly, totally, heartily disgusted with their new homes among the hybrid masses in the overrated, well-flattered country of Brazil.  The party is composed entirely of Alabamians, among whom are MESSRS. JOHM M. HARRIS, W. J. DeBERRY, G. E. JONES, THOMAS McCANTS, T. A. McELROY, JOHN STANFIELD, D. W. BRAZIELL, and eighteen other gentlemen and their wives and children. They give affecting and pitiful accounts of the sufferings of many hundreds of deluded Southerners who were lured away from their friends by the tempting offers of the Brazilian Government, and the tales of wild and impulsive American adventurers.

 

They represent that there is no regularly organized Government in Brazil–there is no society–but little cultivation among the inhabitants–no laudable ambition–no ways of making money–the people scarcely know the meaning of the word “kindness”– the American citizens live about in huts, uncared for–there is general dissatisfaction among the emigrants, and the whole Brazil representation is a humbug and a farce. The American Consul is in receipt of numerous and constant applications from helpless American citizens to assist them in getting back to their true, rightful country. CAPT. JACK PHELAN, who is so well known and admired in Montgomery, has, we learn, left with a large number of other young men, to make California their home.  The advice of the gentlemen with whom we conversed is to dissipate the idea that Alabama is not still a great country – to cause dreaming over the unhappy past–say nothing that will assist to keep up political troubles, stay at home, but work, work, work, and Alabama will yet be, what she ought to be, and can be, a great and glorious country.

The long-deferred abolition of slavery in Brazil is to be hastened. A recent law releases all slaves after two years, and they are to receive wages during this period.  Brazil is the last country laying claim to civilization that still maintains slavery.  It is not sixty years since slavery was abolished in the British colonies, and less than half that time since this country rid itself of the evil.

SOURCES

New York Times, Aug. 15, 1867

Reprinted in the The South Alabamian, Jackson, Alabama, October 1, 1887

McKNABB,  (McNABB)

McKnabb, _. Barnsley said that McKnabb, whose first name was not given, "was aboard with his wife and an exceedingly beautiful girl child. He was accompanied by a Mexican, who had a good deal of gold on his own, which it was reported to us aft in the steamer that this mostly passed into McNabb's pockets." Barnsley said that McKnabb was a gambler, and that he left the other colonists in Rio de Janeiro, "got rid" of the Mexican, and established a  bar, where he did well.

SOURCE:  Griggs Thesis

.....Gambler McNabb so no real future for himself in the backwoods of São Paulo province and elected to stay in Rio with his wife and daughter. Reportedly McNabb relieved a Mexican companion of all of his gold and "got rid" of him after leaving the immigrant party. Presumably using the wealth he extracted from his erstwhile friend, McNabb opened an American-style bar in Rio that was reported to be highly successful. After his death a few years later, McNabb's family left the capital and was not heard from again......

SOURCE:  The Elusive Eden, Page 87

MCINTYRE,

Duncan Colquhoun  (D.C.)

DUNCAN COLQUHOUN McINTYRE OF ALABAMA

FROM A CONFLUENCE OF TRANSATLANTIC NETWORKS  PAGE 189

BY LAURA JARNIGAN

Charles Grandison Gunter wanted Will, his son, to recruit “Porter and Judkins and all like them” but was especially insistent about McIntyre. “Tell D.C. McIntyre to quit his pills and bring his family here at once--- I will give him.....A farm or mill and start in a month after he arrives if he has not the money I will pay his expenses and he will be better off here Naked than he ever was in his life and here his Family will enjoy better health than in the States and if he wishes to plant I will get land and slaves as many as he wants and everyone of them will pay for himself in one year as I can manage it and I want Him.”

 

McIntyre took up Gunter’s entreaty and by mid 1867 wrote to the Montgomery advertiser with an account of his experience in that place  a distinct emphasis on the acquisition--- or rather re-acquisition--- of wealth and the application of scientific knowledge. McIntyre believed Brazil was the “best asylum for our impoverished people, whose previous wealth enables them to live without becoming artisans or agricultural laborers, but who, better than any other people, know the science of that agriculture adapted to this country..... The means of accumulating money here would inspire new  hopes, and arouse new energies, and ultimate in the most splendid improvement and luxurious refinements.” He was “convinced that the soil, climate, agriculture, horticultural, political and other inducements offered by Brazil to southerners, are nowhere else to be found, indeed a special Providence could only excel these; society and the arts must be brought here.”

McIntyre family Background

By John Duncan McIntyre

   My interest in the McIntyre's family history, "McIntyre Family Tree", is a rather recent phenomenon. My eldest son, John Mark, was the first to delve into our background after reading the "Old Letters" that we inherited from my father, Milton Fairly McIntyre. Mark did quite a bit of research during the years prior to his marriage, at that time there was an understandable realignment of his interest and responsibilities (making us three wonderful grandchildren being primary in my opinion.) But prior to that, he drew, by hand, a quite impressive family tree on two 11" X 17" sheets of paper. This became the basis of my research.


     There is an old story that has been told within the McIntyre family that went like this: "when the family 'came over' from Scotland and landed in the States, they made a pact that they would scatter across this new country in search of the best place to make a living. They would keep in touch and the family would reunite in that best of locations; however, most of them remained where they were long enough to put down roots and were then reluctant to leave." Now, I don't know if this story is true, but it does have a certain "Scottish" ring to it.


     Of the four brothers who we believe "came over," John, Archie D., Daniel, and Duncan, I have only been able to trace two - my great-great grandfather Duncan McIntyre and My great-great grandfather John McIntyre. Yes, both of these brothers were my great-great grandfathers. You see, my grandfather and my grandmother were 2nd cousins, which has led my family research in circles . . . so to speak. The information I have on Duncan is the date of his death, 21 Nov 1830; therefore, we refer to him as 1830 Duncan. 1830 Duncan married Catherine Colquhoun (Pronounced Calhoun). Catherine had several siblings, one of whom, Nancy Colquhoun, married Daniel McLaurin, in 1799. Hence our connection, or at least one of our connections with the McLaurins.


     1830 Duncan and Catherine had four children: Duncan Colquhoun McIntyre, Dr. John Colquhoun McIntyre, Margaret Colquhoun McIntyre, and Daniel Colquhoun McIntyre, one of my great grandfathers. One of the missing pieces of the family puzzle is Duncan Colquhoun McIntyre's wife(?). I have absolutely nothing on her.


     John McIntyre 1767/1854 married Mary Carmichael 1790/1835 in Richmond, NC during 1809. They had 9 children; Nancy 1812/1859, Katherine 1814/1848, Daniel 1816/1900, John 1820/1885, Mary 1822/1859, Sarah 1824/1892, Lily 1826/1857, Archibald 1829/1859, and Margaret 1860/?. John, my other great grandfather, married Sally McDonald.


     On 19 Dec 1844 Daniel married Margaret Jane Malloy. Margaret was the widow of August Malloy. Her maiden name was Adams. The marriage took place in South Carolina. Daniel and Margaret had six children that we are aware of: Hugh McIntyre, Duncan "DD" McIntyre, Harriet McIntyre, Robert Dickson McIntyre, and my grandmother/cousin Margaret Isabelle McIntyre. Often referred to as "Miss. Belle" in the Old Letters. With so many names repeated so many times, it gets very confusing. That is one of the reasons we're still not sure who wrote some of the letters.


     1830 Duncan's wife Catherine Colquhoun and son Daniel Colquhoun McIntyre, his wife Margaret Jane Adams/Malloy and children moved to Brazil. This occurred shortly after the disastrous outcome of the Civil War and the infestation of the south by carpetbaggers. First indication of their presence in Brazil is a letter written in 1869 (Old Letters), but we believe they were there closer to 1867. The telegram of 1867 was sent in care of W.A. Gunter, but delivered in the States. They were part of Col. W.A. Gunter's expedition. Gunter, in cooperation with the Brazilian government, started a colony of disgruntled southerners in Campinas, Brazil. Catherine, 1830 Duncan's wife, and her sons, Daniel Colquhoun McIntyre and Robert D. died and were buried near Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Daniel was injured during the construction of (according to family legend) Brazil's first sugar mill. A beam fell on him and he died several days thereafter. Five years after her husband's death Margaret Jane and her daughter Margaret Isabelle McIntyre returned to the States. They returned to Laurinburg, NC and seven years after their return Margaret Isabelle married Duncan Thomas McIntyre, her second cousin . . . and thus became my grandparents. They eventually moved to Port Gibson, MS and ended up in Martin, Claiborne Co., MS, but I'm still not sure of their exact route or time table. My father Milton F. McIntyre was born during their stay in Port Gibson.


     As I said before, my father was one of nine children and repeatedly married my mother Mary Virginia McDonald and I being the result of the third and final marriage. You would think that with so many honeymoons I would have had the pleasure of a great number of siblings, but alas, I was an only child. My wife, Mary Linda Remore, and I had three children, we now have two (we lost David, our youngest, in 1999.) We also have seven grandchildren who are the sweetest, smartest, most wonderful . . . well you get the idea. Of these seven only one is male, so I can only hope that he is prolific or our twig on the family tree may come to an abrupt end. This may sound rather chauvinistic but don't get me wrong, there is nothing more wonderful than granddaughters. I tell everyone, that will listen, that God gives us grandchildren as a preview of Heaven.


     I'm placing these pages on the Web for two reasons. Naturally, one is in hope of getting feedback from visitors with information that will help me fill in some of the holes. The other is to share my information. I have received inquiries from many people wondering if my McIntyre line joins theirs. They usually have a McIntyre in their tree who's name matches one of ours, often it's a Duncan. Understandably there is a preponderance of Duncan McIntyres, named after our first Clan chief of record in the early 1600's, and later our famous bard, "Fair Duncan of the Song." So hopefully these pages will help other genealogical sleuths trace their lost kin.


     Good luck to my many cousins, either real or imagined for in God's eyes we are all brothers and sisters and come from but a single root.

    Per Ardua,

     John Duncan McIntyre

SOURCE:  CLAN McINTYRE     http://www.imjohn2.com/mcintyre/index.html

 Calvin McKnight, after reaching Brazil, learned to make pinga, a sort of brandy, distilled the stuff, and  taught the other colonists how to make it. He settled in Santa Barbara where he made a "good living." He was married, but whether before or after he arrived in Brazil is not known. The McKnight families [Calvin and his brother, Thomas], "made a good appearance in Brazilian life, having among their sons and grandchildren. Civil Engineers,  Dentists graduated, etc."

SOURCE:  Griggs Thesis

Calvin and Isabell McKnight's little daughter, Emma, had become ill on the voyage from New York. Even after several days in Rio, the girl showed no improvement, and the McKnight's felt that they had no choice but to remain where good medical facilities were  available. Calvin's brother, Thomas, also elected to stay in Rio until the crisis was over. The decision by the McKnight to remain proved of little help, however, as Emma soon died, probably of pneumonia.

SOURCE:  The Elusive Eden,  Page 87

 Thomas McKnight, who migrated with his brother, Calvin, also lived in Santa Barbara and made a good living. Descendants of the McKnights still live in Santa Barbara (Vila Americana).

SOURCE:  Griggs Thesis

McMahon.

A. G.

McMahon, A. G. A. G. McMahon,on boarding the Derby, gave a buckskin bag full of gold to Nancy McMullan to keep during the  trip to Brazil. When the ship was wrecked on the coast of Cuba, McMahon accused Nancy of stealing it. McMahon later found the bag among rocks along the shore. He died in Texas many years later at the home of Wiley Simpson Dyer,  the oldest son of Judge James H. Dyer.

SOURCE:  Griggs Thesisi

McMAINS

John "Dad"

John "Dad" McMains, a Scotsman who had lived and worked in the California gold fields in 1849, also elected to leave the McMullen group at Rio de Janeiro. Always a loner, McMains wasted neither words nor money. On board ship from New York, George Barnsley, Major Alexander Braxton, and others often solicited McMains' advise, which he usually gave in terse, yet genial phrases. McMains and Braxton went to the Rio Docey, where they formed a partnership for the purpose of exporting fine furniture woods to Rio. The venture proved successful but ended when Braxton failed to return from a trip to the capital where he had sold a quantity of hardwood for a sum of 10 contos. Braxton had boarded a coastal steamer to return to the Rio Doce, but he never arrived. Most people assume that he was robbed and murdered. Later McMains traveled alone to Buenos Aires, Argentina, then Paraguay, before trekking across the wilds of Mato Groso province to Rio de Janeiro. The trip through the wilderness with no roads took six months. Disappointed at not finding a bonanza mining claim, McMains eventually returned to Texas.

SOURCE:  The Elusive Eden  Page 88

MOORE,

William T.

Moore, William Turner. William Turner Moore, a veteran of the Fifteenth Texas Infantry in the Civil War and afterwards a dentist in Hill County, Texas, married Victoria McMullan, Frank McMullan's sister. Both decided to go to Brazil with Frank McMullan but before leaving for Galveston to board the Derby, he accidentally shot himself in the leg while  cleaning a pistol. Nevertheless, he went to Galveston. When his leg showed no improvement, he ordered it amputated, and then continued to South America. Returning to Texas in 1872, he became a lawyer in Waco. He died July 18, 1905, and was buried in Hill County, near Whitney, Tecas.

Moore, Victoria McMullan. Victoria McMullan married Dr. William T. Moore, a Hill County dentist, in 1865. The two went to Brazil with her brother, Frank McMullan. In 1872, she and her husband returned to Texas. The Moores had one surviving daughter, Ora Montague Moore. Victoria died on Hill County, Texas, in 1874.

Ora Montague. Ora "Montie" Moore was probably born after her mother and father. Dr. and Mrs. William T. Moore, went to Brazil. Family tradition says that her name, in Portuguese, meant "golden butter." She was always called "Montie," and her most intimate associates did not know her real name. "Montie" married Sep Smith, the son of Gip Smith of Smith Bend, Bosque County, Texas. Afterwards, she and her husband moved to Crosbyton, Texas, where they became well known and highly respected.

SOURCE:  Griggs Thesis

O
 
 
O'REILLY,
Unknowm
O'Reilly, a young Irishman whose first name has not been found in any accounts of the colony, joined the McMullan 
party in New York City. He was looking for adventure, and, after arrival in Rio de Janeiro, he and another young man named Dillard joined the Brazilian army to fight against Paraguay in order to collect the bonus offered by the govern-ment. At the front, however, both men deserted and joined the Paraguayans to collect another bonus. They were later captured by the Brazilians, court-martialed, and shot.
Source Griggs Thesis

P

 

 

PETTIGREW,

Rev. Robert Edward

BIRTH    13 Dec 1868,  Bells, Crockett County, Tennessee, USA

DEATH  4 Sep 1962 (aged 93),  Tippah County, Mississippi, USA

BURIAL  Ebenezer Methodist Church Cemetery,  Chalybeate,

Tippah County, Mississippi, USA

Robert was a Baptist/Protestant Minister and spent many years

as a Missionary in Brazil.

He left the United States 23 Aug 1904 and arrived in Bahia, Brazil

on  21 Sept. 1904 to  do  Missionary work.  He  arrived  in  Pernam-

buco  a  state in  northeast  Brazil  on 12 April, 1908  and  married

Brazilian  born  Bertha  Mills,  daughter of William Mitchell Mills

and Dorah Thatcher,  on 30 June 1908.   This is the place she was

she was living at the time.    They  traveled  from there in January

1909 to Maceió, Alagoas, Brazil where their first child, a daughter, 

Roberta was born 15 May 1909.

Robert, Bertha and daughter Roberta age 1 departed the Port of Bahia on the ship "Byron" May 1910.  They arrived in New York, New York on 18 Jun 1910. They made their way to Texas where son William Robert was born on 10 Oct 1910 in Denton, Denton County, Texas. They were in the US doing missionary work for a couple of years.

They left the United States again and arrived in Paranagua, Município de Paranaguá, Paraná, Brazil. Their son Woodrow Wilson was born there on 8 Jul 1913. For the next 5 years they continued with their missionary work. Their son Edward Dunn was born on 16 Nov 1915 Curitiba, Município de Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. In 1919 they left for the United States again.


New York, Passenger and Crew List
Name: Robert Edward Pettigrew
Arrival Date: 24 Jun 1919
Birth Date: 13 Dec 1868
Birth Location: Tennessee
Birth City: Bells
Port of Departure: Santos, Brazil
Port of Arrival: New York, New York
Ship Name: Uberaba
Arrived with his wife and their 4 children.

In 2 Jan 1920 Census the family lived in

Jackson Ward 3, Madison, Tennessee.
They were in the United States until 1922.

U.S. Passport Application
Name: Robert Edward Pettigrew
Age: 53
Birth Date: 13 Dec 1868
Birth Place: Bells, Tennessee
Residence Place: Jackson, Tennessee
Passport Issue Date: 8 Aug 1922
Father: W R Pettigrew
Has Photo: Yes


The missionary work continued in Brazil from 1922 to 1929 when they came back for a visit to the United States.

New Orleans, Passenger List
Name: Robert Edward Pettigrew
Arrival Date: 16 Jul 1929
Port of Arrival: United States
Birth Date: 1869
Birth Place: Tennessee, Bells
Age: 60
Port of Departure: Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Ship Name: La Plata Maru

In 5 Apr 1930 Census they lived in Bluefield, Mercer, West Virginia. Robert was 61, Bertha was 51, Roberta was 20, William Robert was 18, Woodrow Wilson was 16 and Edward was 14.

Robert, Bertha and Edward were back in Brazil later that year.

His wife Bertha died on 22 Apr 1931 in Porto Alegre Brazil at age 52. She was buried at the German Protestant/Baptist Church Cemetery in Porto Alegre, Município de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Robert and his son Edward continued their missionary work for the next 3 and a half years. It would be the last time he went to Brazil.

New Orleans, Passenger List
Name: Robert Edward Pettigrew
Arrival Date: 9 Sep 1934
Port of Arrival: United States
Birth Date: abt 1868
Birth Place: Tennessee, Bells
Age: 65
Port of Departure: Santos, Brazil
Ship Name: Rio De Janeiro Maru.
Arrived with son Edward.

On 2 Apr 1940 Humboldt, Gibson, Tennessee, Robert was a 71 year old Widower living with his sister Maggie and her husband James Taylor Sisco. Robert was retired.

Robert Edward Pettigrew.jpg
Pettigrew family.jpg
Q
 
 
QUILLEN,
O. H.
 
O. H. Quillen, his wife, and five children, went to Brazil'with McMullan. After the breakup of the colony, the Quillens apparently settled in the western part of the grant along the Piexe and Guanihara rivers. There "Parson" Quillen, educated as a school-teacher, conducted religious services which "acted as a centripetel force which periodically drew the American colonists together." The Quillens remained on the frontier until the 1870's. After the departure of their only remaining neighbors, the Alfred Smiths, they moved to Santa Barbara. One of Quillen's sons became a dentist; another, according to Barnsley, "is in the Sertao [the inland part of the country] , the less said the better."
SOURCE:  Griggs Thesis
R
 
 
RATLIFF,
Ratcliff, . After the death of Frank McMullan, Ratcliff, whose first name has not been located, and his wife, accompanied by J. Weingarten (another McMullan colonist) and his daughter, went to Santa Barbara where a daughter was born to the couple.
SOURCE:  Griggs Thesis
S
 
SCHNEIDER,
Rev. Francis Joseph Christopher

 

 

After a year of work, Schneider left Rio Claro at the end of March 1863 and returned to Rio de Janeiro. Having spoken only German and English during his stay in the Province of São Paulo, he had not learned Portuguese and could do little among Brazilians. He dedicated himself to the study of the Portuguese language and helped colleagues Simonton and Blackford in the preaching work. On May 15, he was elected co-pastor of the Church of Rio. After about a year, he returned to Rio Claro to learn from Rev. Blackford that the colonists missed him and wanted him to return. On March 22, 1864, Rev. Blackford officiated his marriage to Ella Grace Kinsley, an American resident in São Paulo. This wedding, held at Blackford's house, was the first to be recorded in the minutes book of the Church of São Paulo. Next month, the couple took up residence in Rio Claro. In addition to preaching and evangelizing, Schneider distributed bibles and evangelical literature, and started Sunday schools, teaching boys Bible history and catechism. His son Robert Henry was born on December 18 of the same year and was baptized by Blackford on February 12, 1865, in Rio Claro. Later, the missionary was widowed and remarried, but the second companion also died.

 

The previous problem was repeated in Rio Claro. The colonists cared little for their salvation or spiritual things. With that, Schneider started to preach to Brazilians. He participated in the organization of the Presbytery of Rio de Janeiro, which took place on December 16, 1865 in the city of São Paulo, and in the ordination ceremony of Rev. José Manoel da Conceição, the following day. In 1866, he made several visits to the promising Brotas camp, whose church was organized on November 13, 1865. In one visit, in early May, he met with George Chamberlain and José Manoel da Conceição and on the 7th he baptized seven people, among them Mr. Henrique Gomes de Oliveira and three relatives of Conceição - his sister-in-law Antônia, his sister Gertrudes and her husband, José Rufino. Schneider's presence was necessary in Rio de Janeiro, where he moved again, collaborating in the pulpit and in the Evangelical Press. He provided valuable services to the new seminary, which began its classes on May 14, 1867, taking charge of pre-theological or secondary education. At the presbytery meeting in July of that year, he read a paper entitled "Some considerations that lead us to believe that the gospel of Jesus Christ should be spread throughout Brazil".

Schneider was well versed in the physical and mathematical sciences and was conversant in several languages. At the end of 1869, he gave an appreciated scientific lecture to the students of the Sunday school in the Church of Rio, carrying out experiments with various equipment. He contributed to the conversion of the future writer and philologist Júlio Ribeiro, who wrote him an affectionate letter at the end of 1869. From September 27, 1870 to January 19, 1871, he helped the Rev. Chamberlain in São Paulo and also did some literary works , reviewing the translation of a Bible dictionary published by the Sabbath School Union and another from the first volume of the History of the Reformation of the 16th Century, by JH Merle D'Aubigné, a translation made by Júlio Ribeiro. Schneider was elected twice moderator of the Presbytery of Rio de Janeiro, in 1869 and 1872.

 

Authorized by the presbytery, Schneider arrived with his family in the city of Salvador on February 9, 1871, to implement Presbyterian work in Bahia. It was a difficult challenge because Salvador was the seat of the metropolitan archbishopric and the center of Catholic action in the country. He carried some letters of recommendation from Rev. Richard Holden (1828-1886), an episcopal missionary who had worked in that province. As of June 13, Schneider had the collaboration of colporteur José Freitas de Guimarães, a member of the Church of Rio de Janeiro. The missionary organized the Church of Salvador on April 21, 1872, receiving only one couple as first members: Torquato Martins Cardoso and Maria Pereira Cardoso. Another of the first converts, the black carpenter Marcos Luiz da Boa Morte, handed the Bahian orange seedlings to the missionary, who,

 

When the church in Rio was inaugurated in 1874, Schneider was unable to attend, but sent a sermon on the govern-ment of the Presbyterian Church, which was read in one of the services and preserved in one of the issues of The Evangelical Pulpit that year. Schneider helped Rev. James T. Houston organize the Church of Cachoeira, in Recôncavo Baiano, on September 12, 1875. Some time later, his son Robert Henry studied at the Colégio Internacional de Campinas (1877 Catalog). In 1877, Schneider left the mission and moved to New York, being transferred to the Brooklyn Presbytery. Collaborated with Dr. José Carlos Rodrigues in the well-known

 

The New World (1865-1879) and worked on the translation of several works, including Charles Hodge's The Way of Life and Archibald Alexander Hodge's Theology Sketches.

Schneider returned to Rio de Janeiro in 1882, being listed again by the Presbytery. He resumed his links with the New York Junta for five years (1885-1890) and took part in the organization of the Synod of the Presbyterian Church in Brazil, in September 1888. In 1890, he moved to São Paulo, where he spent the last years of your life. He became a state civil servant, working for almost twenty years in the meteorology section of the Secretariat of Agriculture (Geographical and Geological Commission of São Paulo). He presided over the synod commission for building temples, whose organ, Monthly Bulletin, began to be published by Rev. Emanuel Vanorden in 1892. He taught Greek and physics at the Theological Institute, founded in 1893, and at the Presbyterian Seminary, which was transferred from Nova Friburgo to São Paulo in 1895. The students were going to have their lessons at the old master's house, in Largo do Arouche. Collaborated with the Sunday school of the 1st Church of São Paulo; seminary students were part of his class. Later, he also cooperated with the United Church. Transferred to the Presbytery of São Paulo, he was retired in 1895. His daughter Mary Kinsley Schneider was listed in the Church of São Paulo on October 2, 1896, by transfer of the 6th Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh, and later joined the United Church.

 

A man at work, Schneider was seen with his white beard walking hurriedly to fulfill his duties. Austere and impulsive, he was strictly exact and demanded the same from others. He always took part in the councils of the church, following the throbbing themes with interest. At the 1903 Synod, which resulted in the Presbyterian schism, because of their statements about Freemasonry, the “independent” propagated that Schneider did not accept Christ's mediation, which led him to make a moving statement of faith. His testament has the following clause: “My faith for salvation is deposited in my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ who died for my sins and, risen, ascended to heaven, where he lives and intercedes for me at the Father's right hand. This is the faith that I recommend to my children and friends, and I urge them, even after they are dead,

 

Rev. Schneider died in São Paulo on March 21, 1910, after a long illness. He was the last survivor of Simonton's companions. Although he did not match his colleagues as a pastor and evangelist, he made a valuable contribution in preparing candidates for ministry, in evangelical literature and in missionary work. He left several scattered sermons in The Evangelical Pulpit and in the supplements of the Evangelical Press. His headstone at the Protestant Cemetery has the following sayings: “Our Lord Jesus Christ said: 'Father! My wish is that, wherever I am, those you gave me also be with me '(John 17:24).

Schneider.jpg
Francis J C Schneider was born in Erfurt, Germany, on March 29, 1832 and emigrated to the United States, becoming an American citizen. He majored in letters at Jefferson College in Canonsburg, western Pennsylvania. In 1861, he completed his studies at the Western Theological Seminary in Allegheny, the same one in which Rev. Alexander Blackford had studied. He was licensed by the Ohio Presbytery and ordained in 1861 by the Saltsburg Presbytery in Pennsylvania. He was the third Presbyterian missionary to come to Brazil, having arrived in Rio de Janeiro on December 7, 1861. The Junta de New York sent him to work among German immigrants. In the same month, at the invitation of the director of Colônia D. Pedro II, maintained by Companhia União e Indústria, he preached several times to German settlers in Juiz de Fora.
Although in 1860 and 1861 Simonton and Blackford made recon-naissance visits to the then Province of São Paulo, Schneider was the first to reside in São Paulo. At the end of January 1862, he spent a few days in the capital of São Paulo and preached in German to about thirty people. He then proceeded to the interior, visiting the German and Swiss colonies of São Jerônimo, Ibicaba, Beri, Cuba-tingo, São Lourenço and Paraíso, preaching in them and also in Campinas, Limeira and Rio Claro, always in German. These colonies were on the land of distinguished citizens such as Senator Vergueiro, Senator Queiroz and Commander Luís Antônio de Souza Barros. On this trip, Schneider settled in Rio Claro, staying there until March 1863 and preaching on Sundays in the aforementioned colonies. Soon, however, he was disappointed with the Germans' spirituality.

SIMONTON,

Rev. Ashbel Green

 

Ashbel Green Simonton (January 20, 1833 – December 9, 1867) was a North-American Presbyterian minister and missionary, the first missionary to settle a Protestant church in BrazilIgreja Presbiteriana do Brasil (Presbyterian Church of Brazil.

Simonton was born in West Hanover, southern Pennsylvania, and spent his childhood on the family's estate, named Antigua. His parents were the doctor and politician William Simonton (elected twice to Congress) and Mrs. Martha Davis Snodgrass (1791–1862), daughter of James Snodgrass, a Presbyterian minister, who was the pastor of the local church. Ashbel was named after Ashbel Green, president of New Jersey College. He was one among nine brothers and sisters. The boys (William, John, James, Thomas and Ashbel) used to call themselves the "quinque fratres" (five brothers). One of his brothers, James Snodgrass Simonton, four years older than Ashbel, was also a missionary to Brazil, spending three years as a teacher in the city of Vassouras, in the state of Rio de Janeiro. One of his four sisters, Elizabeth Wiggins Simonton (1822–1879), also called Lille, married the Presbyterian minister and missionary Alexander Latimer Blackford, a colleague of Simonton in Brazil and the co-founder of the Igreja Presbiteriana do Brasil.

Ashebel Simonton.jpg

In 1846, the family moved to Harrisburg, where Simonton finished high school. After graduating in New Jersey College (the future Princeton University), in 1852, he spent about a year and a half in Mississippi, working as a teacher for young boys. Disappointed with the lack of attention by the local authorities for teaching, Simonton went back to Pennsylvania and tried to become a lawyer, although by that time many people would advise him to become a minister, something to which his mother had consecrated him at his birth. In 1855 he had a deep religious experience during a revival and went to the Princeton Seminary. In his first term, he heard in the seminary's chapel a sermon by Dr. Charles Hodge, one of his teachers, which moved him to the missionary work in foreign lands. He was ordained in 1859 and arrived in Brazil on August 12, the same year.

Soon after organizing the Presbyterian church in Brazil (January 12, 1862), Simonton spent his vacation in the United States, where he married Helen Murdoch, in Baltimore. They came back to Brazil in July 1863. In the next year they became parents to Helen Murdoch Simonton, Simonton’s only daughter.  Besides the Presbyterian Church, Simonton created a newspaper, Imprensa Evangélica (1864), along with a presbytery (1865) and a seminary (1867).

In 1867, feeling ill, Simonton went to São Paulo, where his sister and brother-in-law were raising his daughter. Simonton died on December 9, 1867, victim of a tropical disease named "febre biliosa".

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

SMITH,

Rev. John Rockwell

(Married Susan Caroline "Carrie" Porter, daughter of

James Denford Porter, See above) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to historian Vicente Temudo Lessa, Smith was the “Simonton of the North”. He surrounded himself with a select group of canvasser evangelists who did important preparatory work for missionaries like himself, DeLacey Wardlaw, George W. Butler, Joseph H. Gauss and William M. Thompson. In October 1875, he created the periodical Salvação de Graça, which was short-lived, with only twelve issues published. It was printed in Lisbon, because no printing house in Recife wanted to take the service. In this effort, he had the important collaboration of Rev. William LeConte, who, after a brief stay in Brazil, died in the United States in late 1876.

Rev. Smith organized the Recife Presbyterian Church on August 11, 1878, accompanied by Rev. Alexander L. Blackford, who was then traveling in the service of the American Bible Society . Among the twelve founding members, there were three young men who later embraced the ministry: João Batista de Lima, José Francisco Primênio da Silva and Belmiro de Araújo César. These young people were part of a small class for the study of the Brief Catechism. Desiring to prepare them for the ministry, Smith hired them as canvassers or part-time evangelists, which provided them with practical experience and financial support during their studies. In addition to Recife, Smith was a pioneer in many other places. In the following years, he also organized the Churches of Goiana (21-11-1880), Paraíba, currently João Pessoa (12/21/1884), Pão de Açúcar (8/18/1887) and Maceió (9/11/1887), always under strong opposition from opponents.

In 1879, the famous case of the “neophyte” occurred in Pernambuco. In a newspaper in Recife, a series of slanderous articles against Protestantism began to appear. The following year, these articles were brought together in a booklet entitled “Respectful questions addressed to mr. minister of the evangelical church in this province by a neophyte from the same church. ” The alleged neophyte was in fact Capuchin Friar Celestino de Pedávoli, who was promoting an intense campaign against evangelicals. Through the booklet “The Neophyte Denied”, Rev. Smith gave a concise and thorough answer to the alleged member of his flock.

For several years, Smith had to work almost alone, because the few colleagues who came to help him were transferred (Boyle couple) or died (LeConte, Ballard F. Thompson). The arrival of the Wardlaw couple, in 1880, allowed him to have much needed rest, going in 1881 to visit work in southern Brazil. While there , he met Susan Carolina Porter (1857-1921), with whom he married. Susan was the daughter of a couple from Alabama who came to Brazil shortly after the American Civil War.

As soon as they arrived in Rio de Janeiro, their father, James D. Porter, died of yellow fever. The widow, Susan Meggs Porter (1825-1890), then moved to Campinas, where she opened a American and British pension. Later, Dona Susan Porter and daughter Ella Virginia Porter went to the capital, having been listed in the Church of São Paulo on March 4, 1887. Young Ella came to marry the Methodist missionary Rev. Edmund A. Tilly (1860-1917). Another son of this family, William Calvin Porter, would also be a valiant Presbyterian worker in Northeastern Brazil.

With the transfer of the Wardlaw couple to Fortaleza in October 1882, Smith was again alone, but the arrival of Dr. George Butler in February 1883 allowed the Smith couple in November of that year to have their “furlough” (vacations and disclosure of the in the United States. It was Smith's first vacation in eleven years. Mrs. Wardlaw and her children went with them. When the Smiths returned to Brazil in September 1884, they brought with them Rev. Joseph Henry Gauss and his wife. In the same year, another worker arrived to assist in the work of Recife: William C. Porter, Smith's brother-in-law. On November 11, 1884, the first Society of Women of the Presbyterian Church of Brazil was created in the Church of Recife .

Rev. Smith had a vast theological culture, nurtured by his rich library. His long sermons, at least fifty minutes long, were deeply doctrinal and firmly Calvinistic. His career as a trainer for future ministers began in the Northeast. He taught all subjects, including Greek. On May 22, 1887, assisted by Revs. Blackford and Wardlaw, ordered his first class of three students, the aforementioned João Batista de Lima, José Primênio and Belmiro César. Revs were also his students in the northeast. William C. Porter, Juventino Marinho da Silva and Manoel Alfredo Guimarães. On August 17, 1888, the missionaries Smith, Wardlaw and Butler, as well as the newly ordained pastors Lima, Primênio and Belmiro and the elder William C. Porter organized the Presbytery of Pernambuco.

When organizing the Synod of the Presbyterian Church in Brazil in September 1888, Smith was the rapporteur for the commission that recommended the creation of the Presbyterian Seminary. Professors were elected Rev. Smith and Rev. Blackford, who died in 1890. In 1891, the Central University of Kentucky awarded Smith the title of Doctor of Divinity (DD). At the end of 1892, Smith moved to Nova Friburgo, in the State of Rio, where the seminar opened on November 15. The other teachers were Rev. John M. Kyle, pastor of the local Presbyterian church, and Rev. João Gaspar Meyer, Lutheran pastor . There were only four students: Franklin do Nascimento, Manoel Alfredo Guimarães, Alberto Meyer and the future historian Vicente Temudo Lessa. In addition to theology, Rev. Smith taught English, history, geography, arithmetic and rudiments of Greek and Hebrew.

In early 1895, Rev. Smith, his family and students moved to São Paulo, where the seminary was transferred, joining the Theological Institute created two years earlier by Rev. Eduardo Carlos Pereira. In addition to teaching, Rev. Smith collaborated with the 1st Presbyterian Church, where he preached frequently. At the Synod of 1897, he presented the controversial “Moção Smith”, requesting that the American mother churches help the Brazilian church in the work of evangelization by direct methods, applying their resources in the preparation of ministers and in the support of schools for their children. of believers, not in large schools. Since 1878 Smith had acquired the conviction that missionaries were not to be involved in secular schools. In 1906, this position would influence the division of Mission South into Mission East, with headquarters in Lavras (favorable to schools), and Mission Oeste, based in Campinas (contrary to them).

With the crisis that resulted in the division of the church (1903), the Smith family started to attend the United Presbyterian Church of São Paulo. From 1903 to 1905, Dona Carolina was president of the Sociedade Auxiliadora de Senhoras (SAS), which participated in the campaign for the purchase of the land on Rua Helvetia and the construction of the temple (changed to SAF in 1936).

In early 1907 the seminary moved to Campinas, where Rev. Smith ended his long career as a pastor and educator. In addition to leading the seminary, he held the positions of Greek, systematic theology, practical theology and ecclesiastical government. In 1910, he went to the United States for health care. On his return, he continued to serve the church; Besides working in the seminary, he regularly preached in two places close to the city. From 1904 to 1914, he participated in the interdenominational commission that, under the direction of Dr. Hugh Clarence Tucker (1857-1956), executive secretary of the American Bible Society, prepared a new translation of the Bible, the “Brazilian Translation”, published in 1917.

Smith prepared more than fifty men for the ministry. Among his last students were Jorge Goulart, Galdino Moreira, Guilherme Kerr and José Carlos Nogueira. When one of them noted that he needed to rest, Rev. Smith replied, "I will have eternity to rest." Due to health problems, he retired in December 1917. A few days before he died, on April 9, 1918, he said upon waking up that he had dreamed of distributing leaflets in the interior of Brazil. His wife, Dona Carolina, died on November 17, 1921. The couple's tomb at the Cemitério da Saudade, in Campinas, has the words: “They fought the good fight, kept their faith. Who will separate us from the love of Christ? ”

                                                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://agrestepresbiteriano.com.br/a-vida-do-rev-john-rockwell-smith/#

STANFIELD,

John

Return to Alabama – Dissatisfied Emigrants to Brazil

August 10, 1867

There arrived at the Central Hotel last night a party of ladies and gentlemen who left Brazil last month, thoroughly, totally, heartily disgusted with their new homes among the hybrid masses in the overrated, well-flattered country of Brazil.  The party is composed entirely of Alabamians, among whom are MESSRS. JOHM M. HARRIS, W. J. DeBERRY, G. E. JONES, THOMAS McCANTS, T. A. McELROY, JOHN STANFIELD, D. W. BRAZIELL, and eighteen other gentlemen and their wives and children. They give affecting and pitiful accounts of the sufferings of many hundreds of deluded Southerners who were lured away from their friends by the tempting offers of the Brazilian Government, and the tales of wild and impulsive American adventurers.

 

They represent that there is no regularly organized Government in Brazil–there is no society–but little cultivation among the inhabitants–no laudable ambition–no ways of making money–the people scarcely know the meaning of the word “kindness”– the American citizens live about in huts, uncared for–there is general dissatisfaction among the emigrants, and the whole Brazil representation is a humbug and a farce. The American Consul is in receipt of numerous and constant applications from helpless American citizens to assist them in getting back to their true, rightful country. CAPT. JACK PHELAN, who is so well known and admired in Montgomery, has, we learn, left with a large number of other young men, to make California their home.  The advice of the gentlemen with whom we conversed is to dissipate the idea that Alabama is not still a great country – to cause dreaming over the unhappy past–say nothing that will assist to keep up political troubles, stay at home, but work, work, work, and Alabama will yet be, what she ought to be, and can be, a great and glorious country.

The long-deferred abolition of slavery in Brazil is to be hastened. A recent law releases all slaves after two years, and they are to receive wages during this period.  Brazil is the last country laying claim to civilization that still maintains slavery.  It is not sixty years since slavery was abolished in the British colonies, and less than half that time since this country rid itself of the evil.

SOURCES

New York Times, Aug. 15, 1867

Reprinted in the The South Alabamian, Jackson, Alabama, October 1, 1887

 

 

STEELE,

Joseph Beal

Joseph Beal Steere (1842-1940) was sent by the University of Michigan in a trip around the world, from 1870 (September) to 1875, to collect materials in all departments of natural and human sciences for the University’s Museum. He went from New York to Brazil (São Luís, Maranhão), proceeding up the Amazon, and spent about eighteen months on that river and some of its tributaries. Arrived at the head of navigation of the Amazon, at the mouth of the Río Santiago (Peru), he floated back two hundred miles on a raft, to reach the mouth of the Huallaga. He ascended this river to Yurimaguas, going thence across the Andes. He made part of the journey on foot and horseback; on the way he spent some time in the old cities of Moyobamba, Chachapoyas and Cajamarca. He struck the sea-coast at a town called Huanchaco, near the city of Trujillo; thence he went to Lima; and from there to Guayaquil; and thence, overland, to Quito, continually adding to his store of specimens. While at Quito, he ascended the volcano Pichincha and went to the bottom of the crater. He returned from Quito to Lima and made an excursion along the coast of Peru, collecting old Peruvian pottery from graves, etc. From Lima he went to Cerro de Pasco mining regions, making collections of minerals. Returning to Lima, he crossed the Pacific in a ship bound for Macao, China.

ashebel 2.jpg

By:  Rev. Hernandes Dias Lopes

 

The Presbyterian Church of Brazil is celebrating its 100th and 60th anniversary this year. Today we are present in all states of the Feder-ation and we already have more than two thousand churches with approximately one million members. The Presbyterian Church of Brazil is a church committed to evangelization, education and social action. It is a mainstay of homeland Protestantism. Now, let us know a little about our pioneer missionary, Ashbel Green Simonton. He was an idealistic young man. He left the United States in the glorious times of a great revival and came to Brazil in 1859 to plant the Presbyterian Church. Let us see some important aspects in its history:

 

Your family 

He was the ninth child, the youngest, in a pious family. His father was an elder, doctor and politician, having twice been elected deputy to the National Congress. Simonton was consecrated to the ministry of the Word in infant baptism..

 

 

 

Your call to ministry 

 On October 14, 1855, after hearing a sermon by Dr. Charles Hodge on the task of the church, he felt called to the missions. He took theology course at Princeton Seminary in New Jersey. After completing it, he decided to travel to Brazil. When someone questioned the fact that he dedicated himself to a country still poor and plagued by various endemic diseases, he replied: “The only security is in submitting to the will and divine purposes. Under the direc-tion of God, the place of danger is the place of safety and, without his presence, no shelter is safe ”

Your marriage 

Upon learning of his mother's illness, Simonton left Brazil and returned to the United States. But when she arrived, she had already passed away. Simonton then spent a year in his home country. At that time, he married Helen Murdock. After two months of marriage, he returned to Brazil. On June 19, 1864, nine days after his daughter Helen was born, his lovely wife died. 

Your job  

The young pioneer left deep and indelible marks in the history of Presbyterianism and national evangelization: a) organized Sunday school on April 22, 1860 with five children, using as textbooks: the Bible, the Catechism and the Pilgrim, by John Bunyan ; b) organized the First Presbyterian Church in Rio de Janeiro on January 12, 1862; c) created the first newspaper - A Imprensa Evangélica, on November 5, 1862; d) organized the first presbytery, the Presbytery of Rio de Janeiro, on December 17, 1865, when former priest José Manoel da Conceição was ordained to the sacred ministry; e) created the first theological seminary on May 14, 1867.

Your death  

On December 9, 1867, at the age of 34, he died in São Paulo of yellow fever, this heroic young explorer. His sister, the wife of Rev. Blackford, asked him, in his last flashes of conscience, "What will become of the believers and the work you are leaving?" He replied: “God will raise someone up to take my place. He will do his job with his own instruments. We can only lean on the eternal arms and be quiet ”.

Jokn Rockwell Smith, a worker in the Southern United States Presbyterian Church, was born in Lexington, Kentucky, on December 29, 1846. He studied at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. After graduating in theology at Union Seminary (1868-1871) in Hampden-Sydney, Virginia, he was licensed by the West Lexington Presbytery in June 1871 and ordained on December 18, 1872. He worked as a graduate in Winchester , in his state, from October 1871 until April 1872. Since 1871, he was accepted, alongside the couple John and Agnes Boyle, as a volunteer for the new missionary work to be started in northern Brazil. The opening of this work was made possible by contributions from the New Orleans (Louisiana) and Mobile (Alabama) Presbyterian Churches .
On January 15, 1873 Smith arrived in Pernambuco, where he did a remarkable pioneer work as a missionary and educator. He started the services on August 10 of the same year, with an audience of ten adults and some children. As he still did not speak the language well, he had to read his sermon on Luke 4: 16-22. On the 30th, he recorded in a small pocket diary: “It's a fragile start”. At that time, the only other evangelical work in Recife was that of the congregationals, directed by Manoel José da Silva Viana, a deacon at the church of Rev. Robert R. Kalley in Rio de Janeiro and a canvasser of the British and Foreign Bible Society.
J R Smith.jpg
The Smiths had four sons and two daughters. Of the children, three followed  the ministerial career (James Porter, Robert Benjamin and William Kyle) and   the other was a doctor (Rockwell Emerson). His daughter Sarah Warfield Smith married the missionary Rev. Gaston Boyle (1882-1965). The firstborn, James Porter Smith, born in Recife on August 19, 1882, after studying at Union Semi-nary in Richmond, returned to Brazil in 1909. In the same year, he married Sadie Miller Hall, from Vila Americana, and in 1910 was ordained in Sorocaba. He pastored several churches in the Presbytery of São Paulo and taught at the Campinas Seminary from 1918 to 1930, succeeding his parent. He wrote the book An Open Door in Brazil (1925), an account of the missionary work of the South-ern Church in Brazilian lands. Returning to the United States, he became professor of theology at Union Seminary. He was the last missionary from the Western Mission to leave the Campinas region. He died in Richmond on July 31, 1940.
Her brother, Robert Benjamin Smith, born in Friburgo on August 24, 1893, studied for ministry in the United States and came to Pernambuco in 1923. He was a pastor in Areias and a professor at the Recife Seminary. He returned to the United States in 1929. At least six grandchildren of Rev. John R. Smith were also pastors. Rev. Dr. Morton H. Smith, his great-nephew, 78, is a professor of biblical and systematic theology at the Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Greenville, South Carolina. He was the first executive secretary of the Presby-terian Church of America - PCA (1973-1988) and in 2000 he was elected moderator of the General Assembly of that church. He is the author of many books and essays, and has occasionally visited Brazil.
j r smith 2.jpg
Joseph Beal Stelle.jpg
Joseph B. Steere (bottom row center) and his students prior to their 1887 Philippine expedition
Joseph B Steele 2.jpg