Peter Hardeman Col.

BIRTH 28 MAY 1831 • Rutherford Co, TN

DEATH 18 MAY 1882 • Americana, São Paulo, Brazil

Married:

Nancy Caroline Keese

BIRTH ABT 1832 • Tennessee

DEATH 1882 • Americana, São Paulo, Brazil

Daughter of George W. Keese and Helen Clarissa Butler

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Peter Hardeman 1.jpg

Peter Hardeman

 

 

Lt. Col. Peter Hardeman (left) of Company A, 2nd Texas Mounted Rifles, served under Col. John R. Baylor in the New Mexico campaign. After the War Hardeman took his family and a saw-mill to Brazil, where he spent the remainder of his life rather than take the oath of allegiance to the Union. He died at Cillo, near Americana, São Paulo, in 1882. As of 1977 his descen-dants still lived in Brazil. During the War his unit was responsible for the route and capture of Union major Isaac Lynde's force of 700 men at Mesilla near Fort Fillmore in July 1861. After taking part in other New Mexico expeditions, Hardeman was trans-ferred to the command of the Arizona Brigade and later, Hardeman's Texas Battalion, in the western border region near the Missouri and Arkansas boundaries. On Rocky Creek, Choctaw Nation, he stealthily surrounded William C. Quantrill, some of whose men had been seen with what turned out to be captured Union regalia. A battle was forestalled when, at the last moment, the units recognized that they were allies.

HARDEMAN, PETER (1831-1882).

 

Peter Hardeman, planter, Confederate officer, exile to Brazil, and youngest child of Anna (Bunch) and Blackstone Hardeman, Sr.,qv was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee, on May 28, 1831. His father and grandfather were pioneer settlers in back-country North Carolina and Tennessee. In 1835 Hardeman's family moved to Washington County, Texas. They subsequently lived in Nacogdoches, Gonzales, and Guadalupe counties. On September 18, 1850, Hardeman married Nancy Caroline Keese of Caldwell County. After several moves, they settled on a plantation near Gilleland Creek in Travis County. They had four children.

 

After the Secession Conventionqv Hardeman was commissioned by Governor Edward Clarkqv to raise a company of mounted volunteers. He and his ninety-man Company A, Second Regiment of Texas Mounted Rifles, served under Col. John Robert Baylorqv in the New Mexico campaign. Hardeman's was the only outfit "engaged with the enemy" in the rout and capture of Union major Isaac Lynde's force of 700 men at Mesilla and near Fort Fillmore in July 1861. After taking part in other New Mexico expeditions, Hardeman was transferred to the command of the Arizona Brigade and, later, Hardeman's Texas Battalion, in the western border region near the Missouri and Arkansas boundaries. On Rocky Creek, Choctaw Nation, he stealthily surrounded William C. Quantrill,qv some of whose men had been seen with what turned out to be captured Union regalia. A battle was forestalled when, at the last moment, the units recognized that they were allies.

After the Civil War Hardeman took his family and a sawmill to Brazil, where he spent the remainder of his life rather than take the oath of allegiance to the Union. He died at Cillo, near Americana, São Paulo, in 1882. In 1977 his descendants still lived in Brazil.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Nicholas P. Hardeman, Wilderness Calling: The Hardeman Family in the American Westward Movement, 1750-1900 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1977).

Nancy Caroline Keese
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FIRST TEXAS CAVALRY, ARIZONA BRIGADE.

 

The First Texas Cavalry, Arizona Brigade, at one time called the Thirty-first Texas Cavalry, had a long and unusual history. The idea for the regiment came from "ex-officio" Confederate governor of Arizona John Robert Baylor in the fall of 1861. Baylor wanted to raise his own Texas brigade that would fight to officially establish Arizona as Confederate territory. Most of the men he initially recruited came from his own regiment, the Second Regiment of Texas Mounted Rifles. Others came from Dallas County and the surrounding area. To establish a presence in Arizona, Baylor planned to attach this new brigade to the New Mexico campaign (see SIBLEY CAMPAIGN), led by Brig. Gen. Henry Hopkins Sibley, in an attempt to establish a Confederate empire in the American Southwest and eventually into Mexico.

 

Initially Baylor raised a four-company battalion commanded by Lt. Col. Philemon Herbert. After the New Mexico campaign, more companies were added to make the battalion a full regiment, the First Texas Cavalry, Arizona Brigade. Baylor's hope of ever commanding the regiment disappeared after Sibley permanently removed the governor from control of the regiment by promoting the senior Capt. Peter Hardeman, of the Second Regiment of Texas Mounted Rifles, to lieutenant colonel in command. Sibley failed in his attempt to occupy New Mexico, and his entire force retreated to Texas before the First Texas Cavalry, Arizona Brigade filled their ranks. After several months the brigade never reached full strength, ending Baylor's dream of Arizona becoming Confederate controlled territory and the First Texas Cavalry, Arizona Brigade's opportunity to fight in Arizona and New Mexico.

 

During the summer of 1862, the thirty-one-year-old Peter Hardeman became ill. While he recovered from his sickness, his cousin William P. "Gotch" Hardeman, a veteran of the New Mexico Campaign, took temporary command of the battalion encamped at Victoria, Texas. During his brief period as commander of the battalion William reorganized it and increased the battalion to six companies by adding unattached cavalry companies commanded by Capt. W. G. Welch and Capt. Joseph Head, Company F and Company H, respectively. While the companies camped at Victoria, they recruited men from nearby Goliad County, which produced one more company and increased the battalion to a regiment with eight full companies. After Peter recovered, William left to continue his military service in Louisiana with the Fourth Texas Cavalry. The regiment remained in Victoria until April 1863 when Hardeman received orders that his command would be attached to the newly-formed Bankhead's brigade, later called Gano's Brigade, camped at Fort Hood near San Antonio. While camped at Fort Hood, Hardeman acquired more men from Bexar and Comal counties to increase his strength further.

 

While part of Gano's Brigade, Hardeman disbanded company F and transferred the enlisted men to the Seventeenth Texas Field Battery. Additionally the regiment served alongside Confederate Indians in Arkansas where they experienced limited fighting in the Red River campaign at Poison Spring and the Indian Territory in the Second Battle of Cabin Creek. After returning to Texas from Cabin Creek the regiment received orders to move to Hempstead, Texas, where they dismounted. After a brief stay at Hempstead, the First Texas Cavalry, Arizona Brigade, moved to Houston and Harrisburg on the Texas coast. Due to the disbandment of Company F, being dismounted, and a large number of men that deserted, the regiment's strength dwindled to only 175 men when it disbanded on May 15 at a camp on Sims Bayou, near Richmond on the Brazos River. Shortly after disbanding in May 1865, Hardeman left Texas with his family for Brazil where they lived on a plantation. Hardeman died in 1882 in Cillo, Brazil, where his family buried him.

Peter and Nacy would have six children:
1.   L. B. Hardeman
2.   Constantine Hardeman
3.   Clara B. Hrdeman
4.   B. Hardeman
5.   George Hardeman
6.   Peter C. Hardeman Jr.
1.  

L. B. Hardeman

BIRTH ABT 1852 • Guadalupe, Texas

DEATH Brazil

2.  

Constantine "Tine" Hardeman

BIRTH 9 JAN 1854 • Texas

DEATH 1928 • Brazil

Married:  01 Sep 1887 • Brazil

Katherine "Katie" Keese

BIRTH 4 OCT 1862

DEATH 14 APR 1906 • Brazil

Daughter of Thomas Lafayette Keese and Francis Josephine Hubbard

(Kate was his 1st cousin)

Tine and Kate would have at least three children:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.  

Clara B. Hardeman

BIRTH ABT 1856 • Texas

DEATH Brazil

4.  

B. Hardeman

BIRTH 1860 • Travis County,Texas, USA

DEATH (died young)

5.  

George Hardeman Sr.

BIRTH 13 AUG 1870 • Brazil

DEATH 01 MAY 1941

Married:

Marie "Dina" Bowen

BIRTH 16 JANUARY 1874 • Brazil

DEATH 31 MAY 1931 • Brazil

Dina was the daughter of William Rankin Bowen and Almira Dunn

George and Dina would have nine children:

1. 
Kemper Hardeman
2.  
Clara Lane Hardeman
3.  
Herbert "Burtie" Hubbard Hardeman

Octavia Green

BIRTH JAN 1898 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH Unknown

Daughter of Benjamin Hammond Green and Catherine Dumas

Bertie and Octavia would have at least three children

                         1.  Joel Hardeman

                         2.  Irene Hardeman

                         3.  Vivian Hardeman

Hardeman Sisters.jpg
1.

Dorothy Hardeman

BIRTH 26 MAR 1895 • Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 29 APR 1963  Brazil

Married:6 Jun 1928 • Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA

Gerald Stanfield Strong

BIRTH 15 JAN 1901 • New York City, New York, USA

DEATH 17 OCT 1960 • Clarkstown, Rockland, New York, USA

Son of Frederick Valentine Strong and Estella E. McKie

Dorothy Hardeman

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Annie Hardeman

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Mary Jane Terrell

Elizabeth Ruth Terrell.jpg

Elizabeth Ruth Terrell

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Ronald Francis Hamer

2.

Annette Laura "Annie" Hardeman

BIRTH 24 SEP 1897 • Brazil

DEATH 19 SEP 1973 • Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Married:

Edward Ithamar Terrell

BIRTH 2 APR 1888 • Santo Amaro, Estado de São Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 24 AUGUST 1946 probably Brazil, buried at Campo

Edward was the son of  James Ithamar Terrell and Ida Oliver Carr

 

Edward and Annette would have at least three children:

1.

Mary Jane Terrell

BIRTH 30 JUN 1918 • Santa Barbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 22 SEP 2007 • Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Married:              

João Rosa Palhares

BIRTH

DEATHCampinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil

João and Mary had a least one child

2.

Name not available

 

3.  

Elizabeth Ruth Terrell

BIRTH 11 AUG 1921 • Santa Barbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 14 JUN 1975 • Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Married:

Ronald Francis Hamer

BIRTH 1924 • Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 2000 • Sao Paulo, Brazil

Ronald and Elizabeth would have at least 2 children:

                    1. 

                     Robert Lee Hamer

                            BIRTH 20 JUN 1951 • Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil

                            DEATH 5 DEC 2004 • Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil

           

                     2.  Name not available

Robert Lee Hamer

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Esther Hardeman

3.

Mary Caroline "Jack" Hardeman

BIRTH 1899 • Brazil

DEATH Unknown

4.

Esther Daisy Hardeman

BIRTH 4 MAY 1900 • Brazil

DEATH Unknown

5.

George Hardeman Jr.

BIRTH 1902 • Brazil

DEATH Unknown

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6.

Lila Hardeman

BIRTH 1905 • Brazil

DEATH 1915 ? • Brazil (died in childhood)

7.

Alda Hardeman

BIRTH 14 DEC 1907 • Brazil

DEATH 4 JUL 1953 • Brazil

Alda Hardeman

8.

Augusta Hardeman

BIRTH 19 JAN 1911 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, São Paulo, Brasil

DEATH 1942 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, São Paulo, Brasil

Married :  6 Oct 1906 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, São Paulo, Brazil

Clarence Jones Cullen 

BIRTH 6 JUN 1910 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, São Paulo, Brasil

DEATH 24 JUL 1973 • Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brasil

He was the son of Robert Ranson Cukken and Anna Terrell

 

Agusta and Clarence would have two children:

 

             1.

              Dorris Jane Cullen

                   BIRTH 5 JAN 1932 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, São Paulo, Brasil

                   Marriad:  11 Apr 1953 • Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brasil

              Rubens José Pierami

                   BIRTH 19 DEC 1930 • Fartura, São Paulo, Brasil

                   DEATH 10 SEP 2020 • Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brasil

             2.

             Shirley Mildred Cullen

                 Married:

             Jorge Rys

9.

Mildred Hardeman

BIRTH 1915 • Brazil

DEATH 1962

Hardeman Sisters.jpg
Hardeman Sisters -  Dorothy, Alda and Esther
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Some Hardeman Family History

 

Blackstone Hardeman SE

(Father of Col. Peter Hardeman)

 

 

 

BIO (from Handbook of Texas)

HARDEMAN, BLACKSTONE, SR.   (1790-1867).

Blackstone Hardeman, pioneer Texas physician

and planter and tenth child of Thomas and Mary

(Perkins)  Hardeman,  was born at Hardeman's

Station near Nashville, Tennessee, on March 24,

1790. His father was a North Carolina delegate t

o the United  States  Constitution  ratifying con-

vention and a close associate of Andrew Jackson, James Robertson, and other Tennessee frontiersmen. Hardeman lived in many areas of Tennessee, including Davidson, Williamson, Maury, Rutherford, and Hardeman counties. He took training as a physician and combined that profession with agriculture and business. In the fall of 1835 Hardeman and his wife, Anna Bunch Hardeman, accompanied a migration of nearly thirty family members from Tennessee to Texas. These included his brothers Bailey and Thomas Jones Hardemanqqv and his sister Julia Ann, or Susanna.

 

Blackstone and his eight children and large numbers of slaves (seventeen at the time of the census of 1840) moved often, from Washington to Nacogdoches, to Gonzales, and to Guadalupe counties. Blackstone's wife died in 1842, and four years later he married Elizabeth Foster. Dr. Hardeman's prominence as an early Texas physician was matched in other pursuits by his children. William was a soldier in the Mexican War,qv and he and his brother Blackstone, Jr., served in the Texas legislature. Peter Hardeman,qv Blackstone, Jr., and John were Confederate officers during the Civil War.qv Blackstone Hardeman, Sr., practiced medicine and raised cotton at his San Marcos River plantation until his death on September 14, 1867.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Nicholas P. Hardeman, Wilderness Calling: The Hardeman Family in the American Westward Movement, 1750-1900 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1977).

Nicholas P. Hardeman

DESCENDANTS LIST

 Member:  -- Name Restricted --    Nat'l #: 600093     Ancestor #: A051418

1.

-- Generation Restricted --

2.

-- Generation Restricted --

3.

The Said -- Name Restricted -- was the child of

 

Benjamin Franklin Hardeman born on 18 - Jan - 1816 at Davidson Co TN   

 

died at Center Point TN on 14 - Sep - 1858 and his ( 1st ) wife

 

Eleanor Sanders born on 6 - Jul - 1815 at Giles Co TN

 

died at Center Point TN on 7 - Oct - 1908 married on 7 - Jan - 1836  

4.

The Said Benjamin Franklin Hardeman was the child of

 

Blackstone Hardeman born on 24 - Mar - 1790 at Davidson Co TN   

 

died at TX on 14 - Sep - 1867 and his ( 1st ) wife

 

Anna Bunch born on - - at _______________

 

died at TX on - - 1842/43 married on - - 1808/9  

5.

The Said Blackstone Hardeman was the child of

 

Thomas Hardeman born on 8 - Jan - 1750 at Albemarle Co VA   

 

died at Davidson Co TN on 4 - Jun - 1833 and his ( 1st ) wife

 

Mary Perkins born on 10 - Aug - 1754 at Henrico Co VA

 

died at Nashville TN on 24 - May - 1798 married on - - 1770  

** Additional, but unverified lineage is listed on the application. **

 

ASSOCIATED ANCESTOR (REVOLUTIONARY) RECORD

HARDEMAN, THOMAS

Ancestor #: A051418

Service: NORTH CAROLINA    Rank(s): PATRIOTIC SERVICE

Birth: 1-8-1750    VIRGINIA

Death: 6-3-1833     WILLIAMSON CO TENNESSEE

Service Source: NC REV WAR PAY VOUCHERS, #762, #2832, ROLL #S.115.95

Service Description: 1) PAID FOR SERVICES RENDERED

The Sons of the Republic of Texas, Inc. (“SRT”) consists of members who are direct lineal descendants of those that settled the Republic of Texas prior to February 19, 1846, when Texas merged with the United States as the 28th state. The SRT traces its origins back to April, 1893, and the Texas Veterans Association, which was comprised of members that actually lived in the Republic of Texas. It was incor-porated as a non-profit corporation in 1934.

THOMASS HARDEMAN

(Grandfather of Col. Peter Hardeman)

(Written by A Hardeman descendant)

Thomas Hardeman (1750 – 1833) was born in Virginia and served in the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. He moved his family to Tennessee where he served as the first county clerk. Hardeman County is named after him. He later moved to Georgia and other locales, eventually settling in Texas with his family, where he championed the cause of independence for Texas and served as a judge and as a legislator. He died in 1854 and was buried in Bastrop County, Texas; his remains were moved to the State Cemetery in Austin, Texas in 1937. Hardeman County, Texas is named in honor of Thomas and his brother Bailey Hardeman. He is my husband’s 5th great-grandfather.

This photo appears on a couple of websites,

but I have not been able to confirm its provenance.

The following is from a book entitled “Recollections

and Opinions of an Old Pioneer” and was written by

Peter Hardeman Burnett, grandson of Thomas Har-

deman  and first  governor of the state of California,

and published in 1880.

My grandfather  Thomas  Hardeman was  born  in

Virginia, January 8, 1750; and his brother whom I

never saw,  settled in  Georgia.  My  grandfather

Hardeman was among the first settlers of  Tenn-

essee, and participated in the Indian wars of that

country. He was a stout man, possessed a very fine constitution, a determined will, and a splendid intellect. His education was originally very limited, but by study, he became a man of distinction.

He was the neighbor and warm friend of General Andrew Jackson, and was, with the General, a member of the first Constitutional Convention of Tennessee. He was a farmer and made a fortune, living to the age of seventy-two. He reared eight sons and three daughters: Nicholas Perkins, Nancy, John, Constant, Eleazar, Peter, Dorothy, thomas Jones, Blackstone, Elizabeth, and Baily. All these married, and all reared families, except my aunt Elizabeth.

My grandfather Hardeman was twice married, his two wives being sisters, but all his children were the issue of his first marriage. He brought up his sons to his own business, except John and Bailey, to whom he gave fine educations. They were intended for the bar but never practiced. Both were men of fine mental capacity, especially Uncle John, who was one of the most accomplished literary men of the Western States.

My grandfather Hardeman taught certain maxims to his children that have come down to his grandchildren, and have had a great influence over his posterity:

First. Pay your honest debts.

Second. Never disgrace the family.

Third. Help the honest and industrious kin.

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