INDEX OF NAMES

H - I - J

NAMES

HALL

HAMPTON

HANSON

HARDEMAN

HARDIE

HARDIS

HARRIS

HARRISON

HART

HARTER

HARVEY

HASTINGS

HAWTHORNE

HAYNIE

HEINSMAN

HENDERSON

HENNINGTON

HICKMAN

HOBGOOD

HOGAN

HOLLAND

HOWELL

HOWES

HUBBARD

HUDSPETH

HUNTER

ISAACS

JACKSON

JAMES

JEFFRIES

JENNINGS

JOHNSON

JOHNSTON

JOINER

JONES

JUDSON

H

One of the most successful and prosperous Confederados in that area was Mr. Harvey Hall.  Mr. Hall was a wealthy plantation owner from Colum-bus, Georgia who in 1866 sold all his possessions and land for ten cents to the dollar and moved to Brazil to start over.  Through hard work and perseverance, he succeeded in creating a duplicate plantation and plantation home on the Capivari river near Americana. 
 
Crowning the estate was a spacious, typical Old South mansion, a restful respite for guests and travelers.  Mr. Hall became very successful, bringing in other fellow Georgians by newspaper advertisements such as blacksmiths, housebuilders, furniture, and wagon makers to join the colony there.
 
. One day in October 1877, eleven years after he had come down to this strange land he was shot dead by Jess Wright, the Texas Cowboy, in a field near his home.  there were no witnesses, but it was surmised that the shooting had followed an argument between the two men.  An apparent feud between the two men came to a climax over Hall's shooting one of the cowboy's mules who had wandered into Hall's plantation and was trampling the cotton fields.  In a rage, Wright approached Hall and demanded satisfaction.  Within minutes Hall lay dead.
See Hall family page
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HANSON,

Capt A. M.

Immigrated from Mobile, Alabama, USA  Lived in Carmenea 

No further information yet
Peterr Hardeman.jpg
HARDEMAN, PETER (1831-1882). Peter Hardeman, planter, Confederate officer, exile to Brazil, and youngest child of Anna (Bunch) and Blackstone Hardeman, Sr.,qv was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee, on May 28, 1831. His father and grandfather were pioneer settlers in back-country North Carolina and Tennessee. In 1835 Hardeman's family moved to Washington County, Texas. They subsequently lived in Nacogdoches, Gonzales, and Guadalupe counties. On September 18, 1850, Hardeman married Nancy Caroline Keese of Caldwell County. After several moves, they settled on a plantation near Gilleland Creek in Travis County. They had four children.
Military:
Lt.Col. Peter Hardeman (left) of Company A, 2nd Texas Mounted Rifles, served under Col. John R. Baylor in the New Mexico campaign. After the War Hardeman took his family and a sawmill to Brazil, where he spent the remainder of his life rather than take the oath of allegiance to the Union. He died at Cillo, near Americana, São Paulo, in 1882. As of 1977 his descendants still lived in Brazil. During the War, his unit was responsible for the route and capture of Union major Isaac Lynde's force of 700 men at Mesilla near Fort Fillmore in July 1861. After taking part in other New Mexico expeditions, Hardeman was transferred to the command of the Arizona Brigade and later, Hardeman's Texas Battalion, in the western border region near the Missouri and Arkansas boundaries. On Rocky Creek, Choctaw Nation, he stealthily surrounded William C. Quantrill, some of whose men had been seen with what turned out to be captured Union regalia. A battle was forestalled when, at the last moment, the units recognized that they were allies.
See Hardeman family page

HARDIE,

Rev. Alva Finley

HARDIE BROTHERS.jpg

Rev. AlVA FINLEY HARDIE Jr.

BIRTH 26 SEP 1873,  Selwood, Talladega County, Alabama, USA

DEATH October 17, 1955, • Miami, Dade County, Florida, USA

Married: 14 May 1902 • Villa Americana, Brazil

KATHERINE EUGENIA HALL

BIRTH 15 September 1879 • Villa Americana, Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 29 October 1968 • Miami, Miami-Dade County, Florida

She was the grand-daughter of Confederado, Hervey Hall of Georgia, USA

The Miami News, Wed. Oct. 23, 1986, Page 28

HARDIE

Mrs. Katherine H., 89, of 7229 SW 54 Ave. Oct 21st.  She came more than 15 years ago from Brazil and was a retired missionary of the Presbyterian U.S. Church and a member of the Riviera Presbyterian Church.  Survived by 2 daughters, Mrs. William H. Smith, Jr. and Mrs. Lucita Wait both of Miami; 2 sons, Hugh M. of Ft. Worth, Tex., Charles A. of Montreat, N.C.; 5 sisters including Mrs. John C. Turner of Miami.  One brother; 6 grandchildren and one great-granddaughter.  Repose noon to 3 PM. Wed. at Van Orsdal Coral Gables Chapel, with private graveside services.  Miami Memorial.  Memorial services' 8 PM Thurs. Oct 24th at the Riviera Presbyterian Church. the family requests no flowers and suggests donations to the Board of World Missions, Boc 330 Nashville, Tenn.

Katherine and Alva would have four children

See Hardie family page

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HARRIS,

John M.

Return to Alabama – Dissatisfied Emigrants to Brazil

August 10, 1867

There arrived at the Central Hotel last night a party of ladies and gentlemen who left Brazil last month, thoroughly, totally, heartily disgusted with their new homes among the hybrid masses in the overrated, well-flattered country of Brazil.  The party is composed entirely of Alabamians, among whom are MESSRS. JOHN M. HARRIS, W. J. DeBERRY, G. E. JONES, THOMAS McCANTS, T. A. McELROY, JOHN STANFIELD, D. W. BRAZIELL, and eighteen other gentlemen and their wives and children. They give affecting and pitiful accounts of the sufferings of many hundreds of deluded Southerners who were lured away from their friends by the tempting offers of the Brazilian Government, and the tales of wild and impulsive American adventurers.

 

They represent that there is no regularly organized Government in Brazil–there is no society–but little cultivation among the inhabitants–no laudable ambition–no ways of making money–the people scarcely know the meaning of the word “kindness”– the American citizens live about in huts, uncared for–there is general dissatisfaction among the emigrants, and the whole Brazil representation is a humbug and a farce. The American Consul is in receipt of numerous and constant applications from helpless American citizens to assist them in getting back to their true, rightful country. CAPT. JACK PHELAN, who is so well known and admired in Montgomery, has, we learn, left with a large number of other young men, to make California their home.  The advice of the gentlemen with whom we conversed is to dissipate the idea that Alabama is not still a great country – to cause dreaming over the unhappy past–say nothing that will assist to keep up political troubles, stay at home, but work, work, work, and Alabama will yet be, what she ought to be, and can be, a great and glorious country.

The long-deferred abolition of slavery in Brazil is to be hastened. A recent law releases all slaves after two years, and they are to receive wages during this period.  Brazil is the last country laying claim to civilization that still maintains slavery.  It is not sixty years since slavery was abolished in the British colonies, and less than half that time since this country rid itself of the evil.

SOURCE:

New York Times, Aug. 15, 1867

Reprinted in the The South Alabamian, Jackson, Alabama, October 1, 1887

HARRIS,

John Wesley

John Wesley Harris

John Wesley Harris and his brother, William, were youngsters living near Meridian, Mississippi, in February 1864, when General Tecumseh Sherman came through on the Meridian Campaign.  The two boys watched the Union army plunder and burn the little town.  "It was something," John recalled many years later, "that the North could take little pride from, not the kind of stuff likely to occupy the memorial plaques on the walls of West Point Military Academy....

 

Not long after Sherman's five days of destruction, word arrived that John and William's father had died in battle.  The boy's mother was devastated.  How could the Yankees kill this kind, strong, blue-eyed man, so full of fun and spirit?  She never recovered from the blow.  Within a few months of her husband, she was put to bed.  Expressing hope that she would see her husband in heaven, she died several days before the peace of Appomattox.

 

The Reverend Junius C. Newman, the pastor of the Methodist church, part of the Alabam Conference, had tried in vain to console the widow.  Now, he took the young boys in, sharing with them the little food available to his family.  Sherman's bummers had stolen almost everything they owned, leaving them little more than a few pieces of furniture and the clothes on their backs.  Stunned by events and the desolation that overwhelmed Meridian, Newman began his plans for moving his newly enlarged family to a safer place.  He wondered whether life in Brazil, about which he had read, might not be preferable to this living hell that General Sherman had created.  

On August 5, 1867, Rev. Junius Newman and his family arrived in Rio de Janeiro.  He came as a minister from the Alabama Methodist Conference and settled near Col. William Norris in the town that would become American, Sao Paulo, where he organized the first Methodist church in that region.

See Harris family page

HARRISON,

B.H.,

Benjamin Henry Harrison

Married:  6 Sep 1846 • Monroe, Alabama, USA

Mary Elizabeth Daniel

In 1850 Benjamin and Mary Eliszabeth were living in the household of her father, James J. Daniel Sr.

In March of 1866 the Harrison family sailed with his in-laws, the Daniels on the "Margaret", part of the Hastings immigration colony to the Amazon region.   The ship had a devestating smallpox outbreak on board, decimating the Daniel family. In the 1860 Federal census in Monroe county Alabama, there is a daughter by the name of Lydia.  There is no mention of a daughter by the name of Nancy.  Could they possibly be the same person?  Nancy is listed on the manifest of the "Margaret".  She apparently died young as their is no further mention of her.  She could have been one of the casualties of the smallpox outbreak.  The Harrisons apparently traveled back ti the United States after a short stay in Brazil and settled with other members of the Daniel family in Navarro County, Texas,  No known Brazilian descendants

 

See Harrison family page

MORE INFORMATION NEEDED

Immigrated from Mississippi,  Settled in Coratiba, 

No further information yet, 

HARTER,

Eugene C.

HARRIS  E C HARTER SR.jpg
PENDING

Family group under John Wesley Harris family


















 

HARVEY,

Holmes L.  Rev.

Reverand Holmes L. Harvey 
 

Rev. Holmes L. Harvey was born about 1831 in Lanett, Chambers County, Alabama, and died on January 5, 1884, in Atalanta, Georgia.  He was a Presbyterian Minister.  He married Sarah Frances Dodon, daughter of John J, and Martha Watkins Dodson of Virginia, who had immigrated to Alabama when she was five years old. 

Rev. Harvey and family joined the group of colonists bound for Saterem, Brazil - organized by Major Lansford W. Hastings,  sailing on the "Margaret" in July 1867 out of Mobil, Alabama.  The family consisted of the Rev. and Mrs. Harvey and two very young children.  In Brazil, they would have several more children who did not survive.  One who did survive was Ruth, but she died as an infant from "cutting teeth" shortly after the return of the family in 1870 to their new home in Springfield, Illinois where she was buried. 

 

While in Illinois for three years, the Rev. Harvey preached to a colony of Portuguese immigrants in their native tongue The family, including Daughter Florida and son Arthur, then relocated to Atlanta where Rev. Harvey started a private school., but was in severe declining health - finally dying in 1884 after much suffering at the age of 55.  His son Arthur, would die the next year of tuberculosis at the age of 19.  In 1892, her eldest died, and then in 1884, the remaining daughter died.  Sarah Frances Harvey, Rev. Harvey's wife, who was a school teacher, would die in 1884.  

See Havey family page

HASTINGS,

Lansford W.

Leader of the Santarem Colony in the Amazon.
The son of Waitstill and Lucinda Wood was born in Mount Vernon, Ohio in 1819.  He was a remarkable man whose scurrilous lifetime of adventures reads more like fiction than the truth.  Lansford Warren Hastings began his adult life practicing law in his hometown in 1842.
During the War Between the States, Lansford served in the Confederacy.  In 1864 Hastings met with Confederate President Jefferson Davis in Richmond to solicit support for separating California from the Union.  President Davis also promoted him to the rank of Major in the Confederate States Army during their meeting.  After the War, Hastings revived his dream of Empire building with an overly ambitious plan for a new colony in the Amazon.
He acted as a self-appointed promotor and agent, recruiting colonists for his venture in the Amazon.  Publically known for his CSA service record, Southerners were highly influenced by his publication of The Emigrant’s Guide to Brazil (1867).  Exaggerated descriptions about the Amazon made the region seem to be a highly favorable alternative for settlement; enticing both former Confederates and other international immigrants to join his fledgling enterprise. 
See Hatings family page
 Scout    No further information yet

The family of Spencer Fletcher Haynie immigrated with the New Texas group.  The Haynies were from Fayette County, Texas, and were a large family of the parents and six children ranging in age from nineteen to one year old.  They would have two more children - one being born in Brazil in 1870. They were traveling with the Cook family and returned back to Texas, along with the Cook, having given up the idea of remaining in Brazil and resolved to return to the United States.

Source: The Elusive Eden, Griggs

Military:Name: Spencer F Haynie

Rank at enlistment: Sergeant

State Served: Texas

Service Record: Enlisted in Company C, Texas 33rd Cavalry Regiment.

Sources: Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

See Haynie family page

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Mr. Henderson, immigrating from Texas, was a bachelor traveling with the New Texas group to Rio.  ..... A Mr. Henderson also stayed in Rio, where he adopted a little Brazilian orphan girl.  Henderson and his new daughter remained in Brazil only a few months before they returned to Texas.  There, the young lady was educated in North American ways and the English language.  When grown, she married her foster father.....

 

SOURCE:  The Elusive Eden,  Page 88

Immigrated from Louisiana, Lived in Carenenea 

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Immigrated from Mississippi, USA, and settled in Santarem, Para, Brazil.

 

From 1873, roads were opened linking Santarém to the colonial nuclei with the help of the provincial government of Pará and the settlers themselves. Two roads, Ipanema and Diamantino, connected the colonies to Santarém, in a distance of approximately 16 kilometers (as it appears on the map above, with the same route in 1901).

A Reverend named Richard Hennington (photo right) ended up establishing himself in Santarem. The same maintained religious services in his farm and later in the own city of San-tarém, in the commercial house of Mr. Rhome. Initially, education was provided within the families themselves or when one of them was entrusted with the task of bringing together young people and children. 

Hennington came in 1868 with his wife, Mary Elisabeth, and the three children of the couple: Thomaz, Edwin, and Eliza, the youngest (photo below left). Thomaz and Edwin married women from Para. 

See Hennington family page.

HICKMAN,

John H.

Member of the "New Texas" colony.  Signed petition to the area Governor.  November 1867 Census of Colony shows him living with the John Baxter family.  No further information yet.  Source:  Elusive Eden, Page105 & 151,  Griggs, 

HOBGOOD,

Rev. John W.

James Alexander Marchant and John W. Hobgood of Louisiana

 

Like many southern migrants, Bridget to Brazil, John W, Hopgood of Louisiana had had enough of” that miserable country” by the mid-1869 and returned to the United States with his family. He had gone to Brazil in the company of his brother-in-law James Alexander Marchant. Hobgood’s and Marchant’s wives, Melissa and Louisiana, were two of three DeArmond sisters.  After leaving Brazil, Hobgood wrote to Marchant urging him to return in a letter that provides one of the most explicit pieces of evidence that Freemasons were behind-the-scenes facilitators of both migration and repatriation.

 

Well-written evidence of Masonic involvement in advancing migration efforts is frustratingly scant, a significant number of the southern man who relocated to Brazil were known to be members of that organization. In Hobgood’s case, the information comes in a letter written from New York, the family’s port of entry..” I found a great many friends here who have befriended me. We landed here without a cent but I soon found out that we would be taken care of. We were taken to a tavern and our bill paid until we can get away from here. I went to a Masonic meeting last Saturday night and told them my situation and they gave me money enough to go to New Orleans and where I will make other arrangements. I think 10 days more will land me safe at home.”

 

The Hobgoods could have remained a New York as “the people”  who helped them were “anxious” for them to do so. The family could “do well” there, John could earn four dollars a day and Melissa two dollars. But she wanted to her see her ill mother, so the family returned to Clinton, Louisiana. John's brother-in-law James Alexander Marchant was a Louisiana native, although he is sometimes identified as being from Charleston, South Carolina. He was a planter in East Feliciana Parish. His wife, Louisiana, was a descendant of the Yarbroough and Felps families who had located here in the late 1700s. One of her grandmothers donated the land on which the town of Clinton was founded. The Marchants lived with a Mrs. M. Carr who was a South Carolinian and the titular head of the household, owning $6,000 of real estate and another $6,000 worth of personal estate in 1860. In the greater scheme of antebellum plantations, these are not impressive figures, but in East Feliciana Parish, this level of wealth was at the upper end of the scale.

 

But margins Masonic affiliations are unequivocal.  Their eldest son, John James, was a student in the “Primary Department” at the Masonic Male Academy of Clinton in 1866. In 1867, the Marchants were invited to Washington's birthday “Grand Mask and Fancy Dress Ball” at the Masonic Hall. : George Washington was a major Masonic figure of his day.). Among the committee members extending the invitation was Frank D'Armond and among the “managers” of the affair was O.. P. ( Owens Palmer) Langworthy, a physician from Ohio who had been in Louisiana since 1853. The Merchants admired him greatly and named one of their sons Langworthy.

 

Once James Alexander Marchant got to Brazil, he never left. The family (including Mrs. Carr), resided in the Santa Barbara – Campinas vicinity for many years, although Marchant was living in RIO at the time of his death. The Marchants probably felt added satisfaction with their decision to say when Louisiana received a letter in 1872 for my friend who had returned: “I am indeed glad to know that you are all satisfied down there, I only wish we had never left Brazil. I would return tomorrow if it were possible. Business is at present very dull here, owing partly to hard times, and partly to the summer months. Complaints are heard on all sides, and the cry for Money, Money, is heard in every direction. A great many large houses have failed this season.”.

 

Later in the 1870s, the Marchant’s son Langworthy and James McFadden Gaston Junior, whose father had been so instrumental in bringing southerners to Brazil, shared a composition book, in which they wrote in French and Portuguese. In the late 1940s, James Alexander Marchant’s grandson Alexander Marchant became a founding faculty member of a Brazilian studies center at Vanderbilt University, the first of its kind in the United States. His granddaughter Anita was an official with the Inter-American Development Bank.

 

SOURCE:  A Confluence of Transatlantic Networks  Pages 199-201

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HOLLAND,

Family

Priscilla Ruth Wilson Holland.webp

The matriarch of the Brazilian Holland family was Priscilla Wilson Holland.    Her husband was Franklin Holland.

 

Franklin Harper Holland had first married Mary Ann Quinn, in 1838, who died in the 20th year of her age. They had an infant son who died on December 18th of 1839. The three are buried At Olney Cem. Gaston Co. NC. 1850 Gaston County Census. He is there listed as a 42-year-old male, Farmer, with PR 31, Wiley J. 4, and James, 2.

Will #263: FRANKLIN H. HOLLAND, 18 August 1857, October 1857. Wife Ruth P. Holland. My four children, William Joseph; James Oliver; Leroy Chalmers; and Mary Pricilla Holland, minors. Exec. Wife. Wit: Lwn. Wilson, Wm. W. Torrence (Probate shows witness Law'n Wilson). Original not examined. Will Book 1, Page 94.

Married first:

Mary Anne Quinn

Daughter of James Quinn and Sarah Ferguson

Married second:

Priscilla Ruth Wilson

Priscilla Ruth Wilson was born 22 May 1818 in Lincoln County

NC and died 28 February 1876 in Porto Feliz, SP, Brazil6.  She

married Franklin Harper Holland on 13 December 1843 in Gaston

Co. NC, son of Oliver Wiley Holland, Sr.and Mary E. Moore.


Priscilla was very unhappy and disappointed with the situation of the South. In 1857, before the war, five Holland men had died, the same year, her husband included, then came the war and she lost nephews. After, and above all, the later humiliating situation she couldn't abide, she left her home in Gaston County, in the morning at half-past nine, February 15th, 1867, to Brazil with her four children. They sold their place at Crowder's Creek to Dr. William J Torrence, who lived there the rest of his life. They went to New York. When waiting to get on board the ship Nouth America in February, 23 or 25th, 1867,

See Holland family page.

 No further information yet
Settled in Santarem,  No further information yet, Source  LOP
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HUBBARD,

Richard B.

Texas
Texas 22nd Infantry Regiment

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HUDSPETH,

Lotex

From Texas, 
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JENNINGS,

Family

Clem Jennings.jpg

Immigrated from Tennessee, USA.  Elizabeth Britt.  Elizabeth was the matriarch of the Jennings - Vaughan families in The Santarem, Brazil area.  She was married three times. 

Elizabeth first married John R. Wilson of whom we have no records.  This union produced no children.

Her second husband was George Clement Jennings, born January 11, 1821, in Wilson County Tennessee, by whom she had at least six children.  They were married on November 1, 1843, in Wilson County. William Clement Jennings died in 1852 probably in Tennessee at the young age of 31.  During their nine years of marriage, they had four sons whose names were translated into Portuguese:

 

1.   Guilherme (William)) Jennings

2.  Jorge (George Clement) Jennings

3.  Fountain Jennings

4.  Diogo (James Baird) Jennings

She married for the third time to James Henry Vaughan and by him would have ten more children.  The entire Jennings-Vaughan family group would relocate to Santarem, Brazil.

See Jennings page

Settled in Santarem,  No further information yet, Source  LOP
 Immigrated from Florida, USA, No further information yet

JOHNSTON,

Brothers

JOHNSTON

Dr. Sam and Capt James Johnston were brothers from Louisville, Ky; both former Confederate soldiers; operated a large plantation in Brazil; both back in Louisville by 1871 and in Florida by 1873.

See Johnston Brothers Page

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JOINER,

Mary A.

Immigrated from Mississippi, USA       Married Joseph Hardy Moore 

See Morre family page

JOINER,

Merriman Allen

Settled in Santarem,  



See Joiner family page

JONES,

Dr. Cicero Byrd and Yancey

Dr. Cicero Byrd Jones

BIRTH 29 AUG 1869 • Troy, Pike, Alabama, USA

DEATH 19 FEB 1924 • Santa Barbara, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Married 1st:  1 Feb 1893 • Santa Barbara d',oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Mary Elizabeth Norris

BIRTH 26 FEB 1874 • Santa Barbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 2 DEC 1894 • Santa Barbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Married 2nd, his first wife's younger sister :  Jul 1896 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Martha Whitaker Norris

BIRTH 12 JUL 1876 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 25 AUG 1933 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil



Leonard Yancey Alvenia Jones

BIRTH 27 NOV 1873 • Troy, Pike, Alabama, USA

DEATH 11 NOV 1928 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Married the younger sister of his brother's wives:  1896 • Santa Barbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Julia Louella Norris

BIRTH 8 AUG 1878 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

DEATH 2 FEB 1968 • Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, Sao Paulo, Brazil

See Jones fmily page.

JONES, 

G. E.                

                     

  

Return to Alabama – Dissatisfied Emigrants to Brazil

August 10, 1867

There arrived at the Central Hotel last night a party of ladies and gentlemen who left Brazil last month, thoroughly, totally, heartily disgusted with their new homes among the hybrid masses in the overrated, well-flattered country of Brazil.  The party is composed entirely of Alabamians, among whom are MESSRS. JOHN M. HARRIS, W. J. DeBERRY, G. E. JONES, THOMAS McCANTS, T. A. McELROY, JOHN STANFIELD, D. W. BRAZIELL, and eighteen other gentlemen and their wives and children. They give affecting and pitiful accounts of the sufferings of many hundreds of deluded Southerners who were lured away from their friends by the tempting offers of the Brazilian Government, and the tales of wild and impulsive American adventurers.

 

They represent that there is no regularly organized Government in Brazil–there is no society–but little cultivation among the inhabitants–no laudable ambition–no ways of making money–the people scarcely know the meaning of the word “kindness”– the American citizens live about in huts, uncared for–there is general dissatisfaction among the emigrants, and the whole Brazil representation is a humbug and a farce. The American Consul is in receipt of numerous and constant applications from helpless American citizens to assist them in getting back to their true, rightful country. CAPT. JACK PHELAN, who is so well known and admired in Montgomery, has, we learn, left with a large number of other young men, to make California their home.  The advice of the gentlemen with whom we conversed is to dissipate the idea that Alabama is not still a great country – to cause dreaming over the unhappy past–say nothing that will assist to keep up political troubles, stay at home, but work, work, work, and Alabama will yet be, what she ought to be, and can be, a great and glorious country.

The long-deferred abolition of slavery in Brazil is to be hastened. A recent law releases all slaves after two years, and they are to receive wages during this period.  Brazil is the last country laying claim to civilization that still maintains slavery.  It is not sixty years since slavery was abolished in the British colonies, and less than half that time since this country rid itself of the evil.

SOURCE

New York Times, Aug. 15, 1867

Reprinted in the The South Alabamian, Jackson, Alabama, October 1, 1887

JUDKINS,

Family     

John C Judkins.jpg
John Christopher Judkins was a son of George Judkins & Margaret Lucas (Memorials will be linked). His parents married in Surry County, Virginia, and were on the 1810 US Federal Census while living there. John was born in Surry County, Virginia.John, his parents, and siblings migrated to Alabama by way of Powellton, Hancock County, Georgia, where they are enumerated on the 1820 US Federal Census.
After the Civil War, John C Judkins and some other Southern plantation owners decided to get a fresh start in Brazil. In Feb 1867 several Montgomery, Alabama government leaders signed a letter of support for John C. Judkins’ desire to leave Alabama to seek a residence in Brazil.
“The Elmore Standard” Friday, September 13, 1867:

Brazil – Letters have been received from Mr. John C. Judkins, within a few days, by members of his family in this city. He has determined to settle in Brazil and has purchased land at the head of navigation on the Rio Doce River, in the Province of Espiritu Santo, where he represents the land to be rich, the water good, and the climate salubrious. He intends calling his settlement Wetumpka and expects all Wetumpkians to settle there. [Transcribed by Linda Blankenship]

The Brazilian Plan did not take off as John C. Judkins had hoped. Also, his wife, Eliza, was never well enough to go to Brazil. John returned to Alabama before the 1870 US Federal Census.

John, Eliza, and John’s brother, James Henry Judkins, all died in 1871 and are all buried in Judkins Family Cemetery in Montgomery County, Alabama. It is possible that all three Judkins died of yellow fever:
See Judkins family page